Sam Peckinpah

R.I.P. Alan Sharp, a Writer Too Dark for Hollywood
February 22, 2013

Alan Sharp's movies reflected the confusion, failures, and darkness of the 1970s—and maybe that's why no one wanted to see them.

TNR Film Classic: Movie Brutalists (1966)
March 24, 2012

The basic ideas among young American film-makers are simple: the big movies we grew up on are either corrupt, obsolete or dead, or are beyond our reach (we can’t get a chance to make Hollywood films)—so we’ll make films of our own, cheap films that we can make in our own way.

TNR Film Classics: ‘Falstaff’ (1967)
June 24, 1967

What makes movies a great popular art form is that certain artists can, at moments in their lives, reach out and unify the audience—educated and uneducated—in a shared response. The tragedy in the history of movies is that those who have this capacity are usually prevented from doing so. The mass audience gets its big empty movies full of meaningless action; the arthouse audience gets its studies of small action and large inaction loaded with meaning. Almost everyone who cares about movies knows that Orson Welles is such an artist.