Seattle

The Future of Minimum Wage Will Be Decided in Cities
August 01, 2014 12:00 AM

Why Seattle is part of a trend, not an anomaly.

No Risk, No Reward: Seattle Should Approve a $15 Minimum Wage
May 06, 2014

What happens when you severely increase the minimum wage? We won’t know unless we try.

A Socialist Ran for Office in Seattle, and She May Have Won
November 13, 2013

In 1973, the San Francisco Socialist Coalition, with whom, as an Oakland socialist, I had a fraternal connection, ran Kayren Hudiburgh for the board of supervisors.

This Hit Caused a Concussion. It Was Also Legal. Discuss.
December 28, 2012

Balancing the safety of NFL players and the quality of the game is not so simple.

In Washington, Marijuana Proponents Outspent Opponents 400 to 1
November 16, 2012

On October 31, a six-minute video titled “Chapel Chat with Evangelina Holy” appeared on YouTube. Despite the blurry footage and poor audio, the title character is a dead ringer for Dana Carvey’s “Church Lady” character from “Saturday Night Live.” In Carvey’s voice, Holy reads a letter from a viewer worried about marijuana legalization ballot initiatives in Colorado, Washington, and Oregon.

Washington State Proves It’s More Liberal than Amsterdam
November 07, 2012

Washington state ain't no Canada or Amsterdam. In fact, as of yesterday, it's even more liberal.

The Catchiest Transit Safety PSA Ever
October 12, 2012

After Justin Bieber’s calumny against Tacoma this week, the Puget Sound could use some props. And here to deliver, of all things, is a public service announcement for transit and train safety in the form of a beautifully filmed music video by Seattle’s Blue Scholars for Sound Transit, the Puget Sound's regional transit agency.   Check it: 

Top Research Institutions and Long-Run Regional Prosperity
September 24, 2012

In 1906, James McKeen Cattell of Columbia University assembled a list of the 1000 most eminent American scientists of his day and published an analysis of their geographic distribution in the journal Science, including the 40 cities with at least five top scientists. Those cities correspond to 30 metropolitan areas today. Those metropolitan areas were home to 26 percent of 1900 U.S. population but 78 percent of the nation’s top scientists. Today, these metropolitan areas account for 24 percent of the U.S. population and 42 percent of U.S.

Regional Inequality and ‘The New Geography of Jobs’
August 07, 2012

What explains the wide range of economic growth and prosperity across U.S. regions, and why is it so hard for struggling metro areas to reverse multi-decade trends? These are the questions that urban economist Enrico Moretti addresses in The New Geography of Jobs. In his vision, innovative workers and companies create prosperity that flows broadly, but these gains are mostly metropolitan in scale, meaning that geography substantially determines economic vitality. To start, the book offers a hopeful interpretation of technological change and globalization.

Up in the Air
June 23, 2012

LATE ON THE MORNING of July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart climbed into the cockpit of her Lockheed Electra airplane on a small grass runway in Lae, New Guinea. She was 22,000 flight miles into her daring attempt to fly around the world, a journey that had captivated Americans since she lifted off from Miami a month earlier. Now Earhart was facing the most dangerous leg of the trip: a 19-hour, 2,556-mile flight to a tiny speck in the Pacific Ocean known as Howland Island. Earhart’s celebrity had grown formidable in the decade since her transatlantic flight, the first ever by a female pilot.

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