Soviet Union

A 1995 review by Eugene Genovese of Eric Hobsbawm’s history of the 20th century.

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When journalist Arkady Mamontov aired his television exposé on Pussy Riot last week, the central question was who was behind their riotous performance? Mamontov’s investigation yielded two culprits: oligarch-in-exile Boris Berezovsky, and “some Americans” who hired Pussy Riot and choreographed their act in order to corrupt the souls of Russian youth. Mamontov didn’t need to spell out who those Americans were; everyone watching got the message anyway.

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The sanctimonious former prime minister is being paid millions to pal around with corrupt dictators.

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Baathism: An Obituary

When Bashar Al Assad's government finally collapses in Syria, it will mean the end of a totalitarian ideology that thrived—and killed—for 70 years.

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Dinesh D'Souza obsession with Obama's "anti-colonialism" is translating to some surprisingly good box office numbers.

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Keeping Our Heads

The Mauthausen Trial: American Military Justice in Germany By Tomaz Jardim (Harvard University Press, 276 pp., $29.95) Conscience on Trial: The Fate of Fourteen Pacifists in Stalin’s Ukraine, 1952–1953 By Hiroaki Kuromiya (University of Toronto Press, 212 pp., $60) All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals By David Scheffer (Princeton University Press, 533 pp., $35) Justice and the Enemy: Nuremberg, 9/11, and the Trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed By William Shawcross (PublicAffairs, 257 pp., $26.99)    IN 1952, FOURTEEN peasants, owning little more than a few religio

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In 1951 the United States government responded to nuclear testing in the Soviet Union by scaring schoolchildren half to death with a short educational film called Duck And Cover. The film is roundly mocked today, but it’s a model of practical advice compared to Run. Hide. Fight. (see below), a short educational film funded with a $200,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Security and produced by the Houston mayor’s office.

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In 1951 the United States government responded to nuclear testing in the Soviet Union by scaring schoolchildren half to death with a short educational film called Duck And Cover. The film is roundly mocked today, but it's a model of practical advice compared to Run. Hide. Fight., a short educational film funded with a $200,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Defense and produced by the Houston mayor's office.

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Many commentators have correctly observed that the reelection of Governor Scott Walker is a grave blow to unions, especially public sector unions. They went all in to defeat Walker and, despite the great outpouring of protest last year against his collective bargaining bill, he won by a greater margin this time than he did in 2010. But something else was exemplified by the Wisconsin results. It’s not that unions can’t win a defensive fight.

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Joseph Brodsky: A Literary Life By Lev Loseff Translated by Jane Ann Miller (Yale University Press, 333 pp., $22) Joseph Brodsky caught the attention of the outside world for the first time in 1964, when he was tried in Leningrad for the crime of writing poetry. That is not how the indictment read, of course: his “crime” was that he did not have a regular job, and was therefore a “parasite.” But a scurrilous article attacking Brodsky in the Evening Leningrad newspaper not long before his trial gave the game away.

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