Technology

Remember the Age
July 09, 2010

[Guest post by James Downie] David Brooks's latest science column takes on the great "Internet vs. Books" debate: The Internet-versus-books debate is conducted on the supposition that the medium is the message. But sometimes the medium is just the medium. What matters is the way people think about themselves while engaged in the two activities. A person who becomes a citizen of the literary world enters a hierarchical universe.

Is the Internet Making Americans More Willing to Intervene in Faraway Countries?
June 27, 2010

My colleague on ‘Entanglements,’ Adam Kirsch, posted a perceptive column a few days ago that asked both why we are—as we seem to have been since at least the advent of the middle-class newspaper-reading public in eighteenth-century London, Edinburgh, and Amsterdam—so passionately interested in the affairs of “leaders and nations we don’t know, never will see, and certainly have no power over,” and whether this avidity for consuming news actually brings us closer to reality or instead makes it harder to “see things as they actually are?” It’s an excellent question, whether or not one agrees (I

The Uses of Half-True Alarms
June 07, 2010

Carr grabs our lapels to insist that the so-called information society might be more accurately described as the interruption society. It pulverizes

Life in a Glass House
May 28, 2010

There she was for the whole world to see and hear: a young woman sobbing uncontrollably, completely vulnerable, screaming at her interlocutor on a cell phone, broadcasting the most intimate particulars of her private life on a crowded street in Greenwich Village on a bright Friday afternoon.

We Are Not All Jobsians … Yet
May 20, 2010

My wife wanted an iPad as soon as she saw Steve Jobs’s announcement last January. She even had a place set out for it. It would go in the kitchen where it would be available for looking up recipes, as well as reading the morning newspaper. But life is disappointment: The iPad wouldn’t come out for another four months, and when it did, it cost about $300 more than we could afford. Luckily, one surfaced around The New Republic offices, and I got a chance to play with it for several weeks. And so did my wife.

You Know Who Else Pulled Videos Off Youtube? Hitler.
April 21, 2010

You know those ever-present "Downfall" parodies, in which a scene from the movie with Hitler in is bunker is given subtitles to parody some recent event?

Amazon’s Kindle: Symbol of American Decline?
February 24, 2010

Apple’s iPad is dominating the gadget buzz this winter, but a few years ago, we and others made a big deal about the “polyglot” iPod, turning it into a talisman of the globalized supply-chain. The point was to accent the global context in which U.S.

The PC Officially Died Today
January 27, 2010

The PC era ended this morning at ten o’clock Pacific time, when Steve Jobs stepped onto a San Francisco stage to unveil the iPad, Apple’s version of a tablet computer. Tablets have been kicking around for a decade, but consumers have always shunned them. And for good reason: They’ve been nerdy-looking smudge-magnets, limited by their cumbersome shape and their lack of a keyboard.

Gathering Clouds
January 13, 2010

Google’s reasons for leaving China aren’t as pure as they seem.

Will Facebook Kill Off The Automobile?
January 06, 2010

Lester Brown of the Earth Policy Institute has a new report out today showing that the U.S. auto fleet shrunk by four million cars in 2009—the first time that's happened since World War II. All told, 14 million vehicles were scrapped and just 10 million were bought (by comparison, auto sales had been averaging about 17 million per year before 2007).

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