Tennessee

Correspondence - October 8, 2001
October 08, 2001

Infinite justice To THE EDITORS: THE NEW REPUBLIC misreports my role in the Pan Am bombing case (Notebook, August 20). I agreed to analyze the court's decision, especially the eyewitness testimony cited by TNR for the British law firm of Needleman, Treon. I am not representing Libya or Muammar Qaddafi, and if the evidence after a full review shows that Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi was guilty, then he should be punished along with anyone who put him up to it, including Qaddafi. The problem is that several sources within intelligence agencies friendly to the United States believe it is likel

Race to the Bottom
December 23, 1999

It would seem, on the face of it, that the only thing standing between George W. Bush and the presidency is a persistent reservation about his intellect. The doubts have crystallized around a reporter's now-famous pop quiz, in which the Texas governor could not identify various difficult-to-pronounce heads of state. Bush, according to many in the press, needs to wonk himself up, and fast. He needs to cocoon himself with all those Stanford Ph.D.s and reemerge with a deep, studied interest in the stability of Central Asia and the efficacy of scattered-site housing.

Wonderwonk
May 18, 1998

In this 1998 piece, Dana Milbank profiles Kagan the intellectual.

Freedom's Smoke
November 03, 1996

The Runaway Jury by John Grisham (Doubleday, 401 pp., $26.95) Smokescreen: The Truth Behind the Tobacco Industry Cover-up by Philip J.

The end of obscenity
July 15, 1996

On June 11, three judges in Philadelphia struck down parts of the Communications Decency Act. The decision, ACLU v. Reno, is being justly celebrated as the New York Times v. Sullivan of cyberspace, an occasion for dancing in the chat rooms. The three judges understood how the old First Amendment battles are being overtaken by new technologies; and in an endearingly self-dramatizing touch, they had their separate opinions distributed on floppy disks.

Welcome to the Olympic Village
July 15, 1996

Matthew Cooper talks about race and the Atlanta Olympics

Uneasy Holiday
February 03, 1986

There was always a special patriotism to the speeches of Martin Luther King. No other American orator could bring audiences to their feet by reciting three full stanzas of "My Country, Tis of Thee." From there he often soared across the American landscape in perorations calling on freedom to ring "from the granite peaks of New Hampshire . . . from the mighty Alleghenies of Pennsylvania . . . from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado . . . from Lookout Mountain in Tennessee! Let it ring . . .

Bush by a Hair
January 26, 1980

Morton Kondracke reports from Des Moines in 1980.

Strom Thurmond Country
December 30, 1968

Robert Coles and Harry Huge chronicle South Carolina's persistent poverty.

Pilgrimage to Jackson
May 11, 1963

Fort Payne, Alabama  The State of Alabama, itching faintly in its conscience and outraged violently in its public relations sense, has charged Floyd Simpson, a grocer, with having murdered William Moore, a pilgrim, on US Highway 11, 28 miles from here, an hour or so after dark.  Bill Moore had set himself to walk from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., where, as a white man, he would ask Governor Ross Barnett to begin to understand the aspirations of Negroes to “be gracious and give more than is immediately demanded of you.” He planned to cover 40 miles a day pushing his belongings in a su

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