Texas

This afternoon, Politico reported that Texas State Senator Wendy Davis, a Democrat who attracted national attention for filibustering a bill restricting access to abortion, will run for governor in 2014. A Davis candidacy will surely thrill Democrats and reignite dreams of turning the Lone Star state “blue,” but don’t kid yourself: Davis is doomed.

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The Supreme Court has played whack-a-mole with the Voting Rights Act: Strike down one part of the law, encourage people to use another part of it, then strike that part down. The Texas lawsuit gives them another whack. 

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On Thursday, Texas State Senator Wendy Davis sent out word that she would not be announcing any plans for her political future before Labor Day, as she had originally promised, because her father is in the hospital. Democrats—who have been hoping the fiery Davis will run for the governor’s mansion ever since her star-making 11-hour filibuster for abortion rights in June—will have to hold their breath a little longer.

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“We will not allow the Supreme Court's recent decision to be interpreted as open season for states to pursue measures that suppress voting rights.”

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It’s official: Texas is America’s least favorite state.

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It’s the most common daydream of whichever consultant is masterminding Hillary Clinton’s campaign-in-waiting; for Republicans like Ted Cruz, there could be no greater catastrophe (leaving aside, naturally, the United Nations’ in

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Texas Democrats are giddy over the possibility that demographic changes might turn the Lone Star State “blue,” but the numbers suggest Texas will lean “red” for a long time.

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The numbers don’t support the hype.

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Democrats have been dreaming of the day when demographic changes might turn Texas “blue,” but it seems like Wendy Davis, the Texas state senator who filibustered an anti-abortion bill in June, is looking to speed up the time table.

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When Attorney General Eric Holder announced Thursday that he will try to restore the Justice Department’s authority to review voting laws in Texas, the move was cheered by Democrats—and especially minority voters—who feared disenfranchisement after the Supreme Court struck down a central component of the Voting Rights Act.

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