TRB

The Six-Month Recovery

For the typical American, the economic rebound ended in May 2012

On the eve of the sequester, there's more bad news about the economy. Just last month, Berkeley economist Emmanuel Saez reported that during the first two years of the recovery (2009-2011) average market income for the top one percent in the income distribution grew by 11.2 percent while it shrank by 0.4 percent for everyone else. Saez didn't yet have distribution data for 2012 (and likely won't for many months).

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The Lindbergh-Baby Economy

The sequester wasn't some sneaky Obama ruse. It was ransom.

The sequester was a ransom payment to keep Republicans from wrecking the economy. But now they're blaming Obama for it.

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The decline of an American pastime and the rise of a liberal silent majority.

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The One Percent Gobbled Up the Recovery, Too

In fact, it put the 99 percent back in recession

The one percent didn’t just gobble up all of the recovery during 2010 and 2011; it put the 99 percent back into recession.

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The Pret A Manger Personality Debate: Round Two

Yes, a bad government is worse than a bad boss. But that's not the point.

Yes, a bad government is worse than a bad boss. But that's not the point.

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"Most people enjoy fawning treatment when being asked to spend money," Sullivan argues. Tim Noah is not "most people."

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Troubled newspapers across the country are selling off their headquarters buildings. But unlike other for-sale properties, the Washington Post's headquarters is iconic for its interior, not its facade. I should know: I started my career in the newsroom's Hollywood replica.

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Labor of Love

The enforced happiness of Pret A Manger

I always thought the people at Pret A Manger liked me for me. I was wrong.

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The D.C. Circuit presumes to know the original meaning of the Constitution better than the Founding Fathers.

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I was all set to go into a swivet about the federal appeals court's decision against President Obama's recess appointments for the National Labor Relations Board (and, by implication, his appointment of Richard Cordray to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau). Would it be all right with the D.C. Court of Appeals if we had a functioning government? Apparently not.

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