United States

Irritation over US Diplomacy is widespread in Britain today
July 05, 1954

WASHINGTON, D.C. The present British attitude toward the United States seems to me jittery and touchy beyond any thing I can remember in past visits and protracted stays in England. The American attitude on the other hand seems to me almost arrogantly complacent. The atmosphere, broodingly explosive as a July sky before a storm, has brought Churchill and Eden to Washington. Take a concrete illustration. The State Department asked the right to search foreign ships to block aid to Guatemala.

A European Union Is Still Our Best Hope
April 19, 1954

James King argues in favor of a European Defense Community.

Controlling McCarthy
March 15, 1954

WHEN SEN. Joseph McCarthy arraigned General Zwicker before his Committee and branded him unfit to wear the uniform of the United States, he did more than humiliate a lifelong soldier and wartime hero.

Eisenhower's Program For America
February 08, 1954

In the last message that Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote but did not deliver to the American people, he told Americans that, "We must move forward with firm and active faith." He realized that, thinking in terms either of the welfare of the people or in terms of political (i.e.

Europe the Battleground
September 24, 1951

Michael Straight makes an early case for European Union.

Will the Pact Save Peace?
February 21, 1949

The North Atlantic pact, which involves one of the most fateful decisions in American history, is being discussed in a series of articles in the New Republic. Last week Captain B. H. Liddell Hart, noted British military expert, analyzed the defensibility of Western Europe, and in an editorial we gave our reasons for believing that the North Atlantic pact deserves support. The article below, by Blair Bolles, offering an argument against the plan, is published for its intrinsic interest.

Art, Business, and the Liberals
January 30, 1949

The liberal, as we understand it, is the person who sincerely wants as many of the good things of this world for his fellow man as he does for himself. His credo is the Bill of Rights (still a very revolutionary document), the Roosevelt Bill of Human Rights, the Truman Civil Rights Program, and all legislation stemming from them.

Austria Blames the Soviets
July 26, 1948

Vienna Vienna is celebrating the centennial of 1848, and a magnificent exhibit at the Rathaus vividly portrays the last time the city rose in revolt. The exhibit makes hunger an equal partner with the desire for liberty, as the inspiration of the revolution. The same reasons are behind Vienna’s present growing revolt against continued occupation. This year’s occupation costs are fixed at $60 million, 10 percent of the entire state budget.

Benjamin Banneker: Unschooled Wizard
February 02, 1948

One of the uncommon Americans of the eighteenth century is a man so neglected today that the Dictionary of American Biography, which lists the great and the not-so-great of the past, does not bother to include him. Yet he is a far worthier and more interesting figure than many of the second-rate politicians who clutter the pages of official biography. Many of the Founding Fathers knew and respected his work. Jefferson admired him and helped to make his reputation. Washington's Administration appointed him to a federal post.

Operation Plunder
May 13, 1946

DURING the past 25 years billions of dollars of the taxpayers' money have been appropriated, under false pretenses, by the shipping industry.

Pages