Venus

The Surprising Reason for the Decline of American Tennis
September 09, 2011

One thing seems certain as the 2011 U.S. Open draws to a close: An American man will not win this year’s championship. Andy Roddick was both the last American to win a men’s grand slam event (the 2003 U.S. Open) and the last to compete for one (losing to Roger Federer at Wimbledon in 2009). It’s by far the longest stretch of time without an American winner since the Open era began in 1968.

The Narniad
July 28, 2011

C.S. Lewis’s Lost Aeneid: Arms and the Exile Edited by A.T. Reyes (Yale University Press, 208 pp., $27.50) In 1945, in a famous lecture called “What is a Classic?,” T.S. Eliot described Virgil as the most truly classical of all poets, on the grounds that his work supposedly exemplifies a supreme “maturity of language,” which involves a total exclusion of individual personality.

Perfect Strangers
December 16, 2009

In the popular imagination, the United States and Europe are assumed to be radically opposing poles--"Mars" and "Venus"--on issues such as market regulation, public education, social policy, health care, crime, and the environment. But is that really the case? The numbers would suggest otherwise. My book, The Narcissism of Minor Differences: How America and Europe are Alike, presents quantifiable data on a wide array of social conditions on each side of the Atlantic.

Are Depressions Avoidable?
February 11, 1931

The Question which everyone is now asking is one which has puzzled the world's most eminent economists for decades. It is impossible to discuss it briefly without seeming dogmatic or oversimple. To muster the adequate authority, to make the necessary elaborations and qualifications and to marshal the necessary statistics, would be a task for a research staff scouring an encyclopedic literature and pounding batteries of computing machines for years.