Wall Street Journal

The Only Way to End Gridlock in Washington Is for Obama to Run a Negative Campaign
November 23, 2011

Rebutting the main argument in Doug Schoen and Patrick Caddell’s latest travesty of an op-ed column (“The Hillary Moment,” in Monday’s Wall Street Journal) would be a pretty egregious example of shooting fish in a barrel.

Political Geography 101, Cont'd
November 14, 2011

Just a few days ago, I said once again that I would try to resist engaging in media criticism on this blog. Today I'm going to officially declare one of the exceptions to that rule: when I see the need to correct the record on matters of political geography, a subject of special interest to me. In this case, I'm basically rehashing a point I made a couple weeks ago because, well, it appears no one's paying me any mind. So here goes again.

Is This The Time For A Quarter-Billionaire?
November 08, 2011

We'll find out tonight whether the labor-led revolt against John Kasich in Ohio is as strong as the polls have indicated, and we'll spend tomorrow trying to prognosticate how much of that revolt will carry over into next year's presidential election in that extremely crucial swing state. But for now, let's just pose the question that's been on my mind a lot recently: at a time when voters are in a deeply populist mood and generally awakening to the stark reality of extreme income inequality, is the Republican Party really on the verge of nominating a man with an estimated $250 million to his

Daily Deadline: Fanatics & Foreclosures
October 18, 2011

[with contributions from Matthew O'Brien and Darius Tahir] Anarchy is all fun and games, I suppose, until you need to get something done – like, say, condemn the handful of anti-Semites in your midst. That’s the message Michelle Goldberg sends in a new piece she’s just written for Tablet.

Be Nice to the Fat Cat
October 13, 2011

If I were to write a parody of a financial executive whining about President Obama, I imagine it’d look just like an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal on Thursday. The author is David Moore. The identification line at the bottom of the essay tells us that he is the CEO of a financial firm called Moore Holdings and – this is important – that he is a trustee of several major New York charities. It’s one of several places in the op-ed we are supposed to learn that Moore is compassionate.

About Those Protests
October 13, 2011

Tim Noah gives his take.

How Congress’s Showdown With China Puts Obama in a Serious Bind
October 06, 2011

While all of Washington fastened its gaze on Chris Christie, the most important issue of the week—maybe of the year—was playing out on the floor of the Senate.

Why the Electoral College Won’t Help Obama
September 29, 2011

Writing in the Wall Street Journal this week, Gerald Seib rightly reminds us that presidential campaigns are won and lost state by state in the Electoral College, not in the nationwide popular vote.

You Call This Populism? The New Obama Is the Same as the Old Obama.
September 22, 2011

In his deficit-reduction proposal, unveiled in his Rose Garden speech on Monday, President Obama once again found himself adopting the other party’s frame, embracing budget austerity instead of the fiscal stimulus that the economy needs. He still talks about finding bipartisan consensus and describes his ideas as common-sense solutions that every well-intentioned person should support, even though Republicans have shown they’ll block anything with his name on it.

Please Allow Me To Introduce Myself
September 11, 2011

Having already received three very generous public introductions (from TNR’s Richard Just, Jonathan Cohn, and my predecessor, Jonathan Chait), I’ll try to keep this brief. My name is Timothy Noah. Until recently I was a senior writer at Slate magazine, a position I held for about a dozen years. At Slate I wrote something called Chatterbox that pretended to be a gossip column but was actually a column mostly about domestic politics and policy.

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