Walter Reuther

The White Man Whose 'March on Washington' Speech You Should Remember Too
August 21, 2013

The 1963 March on Washington featured just one prominent white speaker.

Not With a Bang, But a Whimper: The Long, Slow Death Spiral of America’s Labor Movement
June 06, 2012

Many commentators have correctly observed that the reelection of Governor Scott Walker is a grave blow to unions, especially public sector unions. They went all in to defeat Walker and, despite the great outpouring of protest last year against his collective bargaining bill, he won by a greater margin this time than he did in 2010. But something else was exemplified by the Wisconsin results. It’s not that unions can’t win a defensive fight.

Mike Wallace, 1918-2012
April 09, 2012

 "I think it must be terrible to hate as many things as Mr. [Westbrook] Pegler hates, and I would be unhappy I think and therefore I'm afraid that he's unhappy and I'm sorry for him because after all we all grow older and we all have to live with ourselves and I think that must sometimes be difficult for Mr. Pegler." --Eleanor Roosevelt to Mike Wallace, Nov. 23, 1957, "The Mike Wallace Interview." "I don't think architecture is for the mob. It certainly isn't for education.

Why I Miss ‘Big Labor’
September 06, 2010

Washington—Watching the great civil rights march on television in August 1963, I couldn't help but notice that hundreds carried signs with a strange legend at the top: "UAW Says." UAW was saying "Segregation Disunites the United States," and many other things insisting on equality. This "UAW" was a very odd word to my 11-year-old self and I asked my dad who or what "U-awe," as I pronounced it, was.

Auto-Dependent Communities to Gain from Health Reform
March 30, 2010

Big-time health care reform, now passed, will, like a lot of federal policy, have different effects in the very different American metros that make up our national economy.

The Operator
July 01, 2009

The first time I remember speaking with Karen Ignagni was via a TV satellite, for a debate about health care policy on CNN. It was the summer of 2007, not long after the debut of Michael Moore's Sicko, and each of us was playing our usual role. Ignagni is the telegenic president of America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) and arguably Washington's most influential health-industry lobbyist.

Auto Destruct
December 31, 2008

It's been more than a month since the auto industry came to Washington, begging for a rescue. And, since that time, it's become clear just how dry Detroit's reservoir of goodwill has run. For conservative opponents of bailout legislation, like Alabama Senator Richard Shelby, the U.S. auto industry is an object of scorn—"dinosaurs," he has called them. For the liberals who support a rescue, like Connecticut Senator Christopher Dodd, Detroit remains an embarrassment.

A Fighting Faith
December 13, 2004

On January 4, 1947, 130 men and women met at Washington's Willard Hotel to save American liberalism. A few months earlier, in articles in The New Republic and elsewhere, the columnists Joseph and Stewart Alsop had warned that "the liberal movement is now engaged in sowing the seeds of its own destruction." Liberals, they argued, "consistently avoided the great political reality of the present: the Soviet challenge to the West." Unless that changed, "In the spasm of terror which will seize this country ...

The Closing of the American City
May 11, 1998

From 1998, Wilson reviews books on integration and the impact of the Rodney King incident.

The Contract with K Street
December 04, 1995

When 367 Republican House candidates signed the Contract with America on September 27, 1994, they pledged to create "a Congress that is doing what the American people want and doing it in a way that instills trust." As they stood on the steps of the Capitol, Texas Representative Dick Armey declared, "[W]e enter a new era in American government. Today one political party is listening to the concerns of the American people, and we are responding with specific legislation.

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