Washington Post

"Awarding a prize to a newspaper that covered a hurricane does not somehow vindicate the hurricane.”

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The Post's NSA coverage has been the opposite of insightful.

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George Will, Tea Party Tory

America's most famous bow-tied conservative finds his wild side

America's most famous bow-tied conservative has found his wild side. 

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How to make sense of a watershed moment in media.

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The New York Times' web redesign dumped the page break—and helped kill off one of the web's most annoying features

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The Washington Post issued a correction in Wednesday's print edition that has newspaper nerds in ecstasy. It reads:

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In his Thursday column in The Washington Post, George Will gives a perfect encapsulation of his (widely shared) worldview and values without quite meaning to do so. For this reason, if no other, it deserves close attention.

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Did the White House just open the door to some kind of short-term increase in the debt limit, perhaps to allow broader negotiations over fiscal priorities? Several media outlets are reporting as much. A senior administration official says that’s incorrect. I’m not sure who’s right or how much it actually matters. But, just in case, here’s the story.

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It’s 2:06 pm on a Tuesday and Capitol Hill reporter Paul Kane is reporting from the Capitol building atrium for The Washington Post’s PostTV. Eyes panicked, Kane looks a bit like he has been kidnapped from his desk and pushed in front of the camera. He clutches his notepad like an awkward stage prop. “Here’s a fun, random fact for you,” he says with all the screen presence of a graphing calculator.

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The Washington Post, in grave financial trouble, was bought by a very wealthy man whose biographer called him “an energetic young tycoon.”1 Highly successful as a banker and Wall Street investor, the new publisher had never before worked at a newspaper, let alone owned one, but he had shown a fine head for business and was known to be far-sighted. He had plenty of new money and wanted to do something civic-minded.

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