Wen Jiabao

This year’s succession of power has been far from smooth. China’s political elite is clearly divided against itself.

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In China, a perennial T.V. favorite is the “rear palace” costume drama, depicting the conspiratorial high politics of bygone dynasties. An analogous kind of half-concealed theatre seems to be taking place today, not behind the sequestered walls of the imperial palace, but in the Chinese Communist Party’s headquarters at Zhongnanhai.

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Kathmandu—After four prime ministers in four years, Nepal might finally be entering a period of stability. On November 1, Nepalese politicians reached a deal on demobilizing nearly 20,000 Maoist fighters who have been in limbo since a 2006 peace agreement ended the ten year insurgency.

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Behold China

For decades, various Chinese officials and outsiders have reassured the world that the country’s Communist Party leadership eventually planned to open up its one-party political system. The regime would undertake major political reforms and liberalization, it was said, to accompany the economic reforms launched by Deng Xiaoping in the late ’70s. It was merely a question of choosing the right time. Writing in Foreign Affairs two years ago, John L.

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This past summer, National Economic Council Director Larry Summers laid out a new vision for the next American economy: one that is export-oriented, low-carbon, innovation-fueled, and opportunity-rich. Dr.

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Analysts are still mulling over the Copenhagen accord, trying to figure out what it means for the fate of global climate politics. The humdrum answer is that it all depends—we'll have to see how individual nations tackle their CO2 emissions in the months and years ahead, and then watch how the next round of international talks shake out. But if it's specifics you want, check out Harvard economist Robert Stavin's analysis. First, a recap of the negotiations that led to the deal: From all reports, the talks were completely deadlocked when U.S.

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It looks like, at the very last minute, the heads of state at Copenhagen pulled a rabbit out of the ol' cap and struck a deal—but it's a mangy-looking rabbit at that. Here's the Wall Street Journal: The White House said Friday that U.S. President Barack Obama, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and South African President Jacob Zuma reached a "meaningful agreement" for combating climate change.

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It’s now widely believed that the global recession is coming to an end, but the path out has been far from typical: This time around, China, not the U.S. has led the global recovery. With its $600 billion stimulus package and with banks lending with abandon, China has become the engine of global manufacturing and industrial activity.

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Peking Over Our Shoulder

Our Chinese shareholders get nosy.

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  One of the top creditors of the entity known as "America," Chinese premier Wen Jibao, is getting a little anxious about his investment. Per the FT: Wen Jiabao, the Chinese premier, expressed concern about the value of China’s large holdings of US assets on Friday and warned America to take measures to guarantee its “good credit”. ... “We have lent a huge amount of money to the United States,” Mr Wen said. “Of course we are concerned about the safety of our assets. To be honest, I am a little bit worried.

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