Western Europe

Can Labor Come Back?
May 23, 1994

The recent Teamsters strike, The Los Angeles Times declared, "has served as a reminder of how much the union's influence has waned." The outcome, The New York Times wrote, showed how the union's "power has shrunk." There is some truth in these statements, but they reveal more about the national press's attitude toward labor than about the Teamsters union. During the twenty-four-day strike, the longest in Teamster history and the first since 1979, the union achieved almost 100 percent support from its rank and file, in spite of violent dissension in its upper ranks. In the provisional settlemen

Homage to Catalunya
May 18, 1992

Robert Hughes’s book is an elitist’s study of a provincial culture, but that is not quite the contradiction that it appears to be.

Years of Iron
August 20, 1990

Ovid's Poetry of Exile Translated by David R.

The Decline of the City Mahagonny
June 25, 1990

Robert Hughes explains how New York in the 1980s is *not* Paris in the 1890s. He gives a compelling account of the decline of the fine arts in America

After the Wall
December 04, 1989

The Editors: What now?

The Telltale Scar
August 07, 1989

Budapest—On the banks of the Danube, it is quite natural to ask whether the idea of Central Europe has been just a whim of a few intellectuals, or acquires now a new significance thanks to the aspirations for democracy that have been reawakened in many countries. The simple fact is that our perspective, whether we are Poles or Hungarians or Yugoslavs, is different from the perspective of Western Europeans, Russians, or Americans.

The End of the Reagan Boom
July 01, 1985

What’s going on here? Only a year ago, the economy was racing along at the fastest clip in more than 30 years. Personal income was up, inflation was down, and to many Americans, if seemed positively churlish to deny that President Reagan had succeeded in "laying the foundations for a decade of supply-side growth." Administration supporters claimed that as long as Federal Reserve chairman Paul Volcker was kept from sabotaging "the Reagan recovery" through an overtight money policy, the future looked bright. Long-term interest rates would gradually settle down to a more reasonable level.

The Light in the East
September 20, 1980

    During the last week in August in 1980 a new kind of light appeared in Poland, illuminating the world scene in an unexpected way. An eerie sentence swam into my mind, the one that Winston Churchill wrote about 1914 when the pall of the parochial Irish crisis hung over the warm summer evening of the British Empire; and when the parishes of Fermanagh and Tyrone faded into the mists and squalls of Ireland, "and a strange light began immediately, but by perceptible gradations, to fall and grow upon the map of Europe." That strange light, in 1914, was the glimmering advent of World War I.

Nixon and the World
January 06, 1973

Trying to evaluate the foreign policy of the Nixon administration during its first term, one must, as always in foreign policy, distinguish between rhetoric and policy. Rhetoric and policy may by and large coincide, one reflecting the other, or a wide gap may separate the two. In the latter case, what governments do is more important than what they say they are doing or are going to do.

The Flyer and the Yahoos
October 03, 1970

The Wartime Journals of Charles A. Lindbergh (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich; $12.95) In 1098 Lindbergh moved in the highest diplomatic and military circles of London, Paris and Berlin. He also made a trip to the Soviet Union, where he was well received and given a good look at Soviet aviation; but his subsequent comments about Russia—comments distorted, he claimed, by the press—caused the Soviets later to announce that if he ever came back to see [hem he would be arrested. His dislike of Russia and Communism permeates these Journals, as does his admiration for the Germans.

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