World

Egypt's Heroic Protesters Bear Responsibility for the Mess that Followed

The incoherence of Tahrir Square's activists

A new movie might win an Oscar for celebrating Egypt's new "culture of protest." Too bad that culture is so incoherent.

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How Did Zimbabwe Become So Poor—And Yet So Expensive?

The shockingly high prices of one of Africa's most impoverished countries

The shockingly high prices of one of Africa's most impoverished countries.

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Is the U.S. the Last Country Still Fighting the Drug War?

Uruguay's new pot law is a big blow to Washington drug policy

Uruguay's new pot law is another big blow to Washington's drug policy

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A Guy Who Lives in Pennsylvania May Be Taking Down the Entire Turkish Government

A profile of Fetullah Gulen, the prime minister's greatest enemy

Inside the movement of Fetullah Gulen, the Islamic leader in rural Pennsylvania who may be toppling Turkey's government. 

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Like many of his law-abiding compatriots, Petr Sourek resents how corruption rewards cheating and is a drag on economic growth. But unlike others he decided to try and profit—legally—from the Czech Republic’s sleazy intersection of business and politics.In 2011 he created Corrupt Tour, a company that offers a series of sightseeing tours that highlight, and mock, some of Prague’s most outrageous corruption scandals in the post-communist era.

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Venezuela's Christmas Started in November

Citizens are calling their new president 'St. Nick' after he forced shops to have blowout sales

Citizens are calling their president "Saint Nick" after he used his power to force businesses to have huge, blowout sales. 

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The laws of demographics say violence against women in India will only get worse. Uh-oh.

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Some Bulgarians have even burned themselves alive in protest.

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In 2050, 71 per cent of Alzheimer's patients will be in low to middle income countries. Will they be able to access medical care?

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“The visa question has insidious ways of sowing the seeds of self-censorship,” Dorinda Elliott, the global affairs editor at Condé Nast Traveler, wrote on ChinaFile last month. “I am ashamed to admit that I personally have worried about the risk of reporting on sensitive topics, such as human rights lawyers: what if they don’t let me back in?” Elliott is a longtime China hand who worked as Newsweek’s Beijing bureau chief in the late 1980s.

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