World

The Crossroads
May 04, 2011

The death of Osama bin Laden will raise the inevitable question: What are we still doing in Afghanistan? The answer, of course, is that the mission in Afghanistan is about something bigger and more ambitious than eliminating Al Qaeda’s leaders—most of whom, in any event, are probably living in Pakistan, as bin Laden was when the United States finally tracked him down. No, the mission in Afghanistan isn’t about killing Al Qaeda members.

A Victory for Democratic Foreign Policy
May 03, 2011

Dobson argues that Bin Laden's death was a victory for Democratic foreign policymakers and helped cement Obama's place in history.

America Reacts to Osama bin Laden’s Death
May 02, 2011

When news broke Sunday night that Osama bin Laden was dead—killed by a team of Navy SEALs near Islamabad, Pakistan—Americans burst into the streets to celebrate. Times Square, Ground Zero, and the White House were scenes of particular jubilation. Here, we have compiled some of the most poignant images of the revelry. New York City ROTC students from NYU Ground Zero Alex, who didn’t give his last name, says he served two tours of duty in Iraq as a Marine.

Deep Impact
May 02, 2011

Paul Berman on understanding the symbolism of Osama bin Laden's death in the history of American democracy.

The End
May 02, 2011

David Greenberg on the conclusion of the bin Laden narrative.

Forget Negotiations
May 02, 2011

The reconciliation between Fatah and Hamas is certainly bad news for peace. But this does not mean it is bad news as such. Because the most urgent need for the future survival of both Israel and Palestine is not peace. It is partition. And the reconciliation may actually be good news for the prospect of partition. It is, by now, abundantly clear that the two sides of the conflict are unable to reach a peace accord.

Think Small, Not Big
May 02, 2011

  The joint Fatah-Hamas statement in Cairo this week announcing an impending agreement between the two leading Palestinian factions has caught nearly everybody off their guard.

Who Are the Libyan Rebels?
April 30, 2011

Benghazi, Libya—After the February 17 start of the revolution against longtime Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi, rebels moved swiftly to capitalize on their success by establishing interim governing and administrative bodies: the National Transitional Council (NTC), Crisis Team (CT), and Military Council. But who, exactly, is in these groups?

The Throwback
April 30, 2011

In 2001, Amr Moussa, the current Egyptian Secretary-General of the Arab League, briefly achieved pop-icon status. Serving at the time as Hosni Mubarak’s foreign minister, Moussa’s frequent anti-Israel pronouncements caught the attention of Egyptian pop singer Shaaban Abdel Rahim, who released a song with the line, “I hate Israel and I love Amr Moussa.” The song became a tremendous hit. Shortly thereafter, Mubarak, who had come to regard Moussa as a serious political rival, exiled him to the Arab League. Ten years later, however, Moussa is back in the public eye.

Tel Aviv Journal: Notes on a Roiling Region
April 29, 2011

I. “The standard left-wing person never seems more comfortable than when attacking Israel.” This is the novelist Martin Amis talking to Ha’aretz when he was in Israel this past fall.“Everyone else is protected,” Amis continued, “by having dark skin or colonial history or something. But you can attack Israel.” Freely! Of course, it’s not only the standard left-wing person who is so empowered, but also those who belong to mainstream Protestant churches associated with the National Council of Churches on Riverside Drive in Manhattan.

Pages