Bob Dornan

Aaron Blake argues today that present-day circumstances make it more likely that Members of the House can win presidential nominations, something that as he notes hasn’t happened for some time. He points to former Speaker Newt Gingrich and current Members Mike Pence and Michele Bachmann as potentially viable national candidates this time around. I continue to disagree. Let’s see what we have here. First, I think Blake undercounts past House candidacies during recent (post-reform) history.

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Will You Be My Valentine?

I'm sorry I did not get to this earlier, and there's way too much to riff on in just this single post, but please, please do yourself a favor and read National Review's Valentine's Day Symposium. Midge Decter swooning for Rudy! Andrew Breitbart sharing his "unrequited" love for lesbian Tammy Bruce! Mona Charen shows off by hearting some nineteenth-century Republican pol named Thomas Brackett Reed! But by far the best is Kathryn Jean-Lopez's tribute to B-1 Bob Dornan, who ranks next to Jim Traficant as the most amusing member in the history of the House of Representatives.

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Campaign Journal: Dole and Buchanan in 1996.

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Animal Farm

Michael Lewis's 1996 campaign journal.

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The Griz

Michael Lewis on the 1996 campaign.

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The Executive

In the last four months, House Speaker Newt Gingrich has compared himself to a variety of Capitol Hill forebears: Nicholas Longworth, House speaker during the 1920s; Henry Clay; and the leaders of the Radical Republicans who dominated Congress after the Civil War. His press secretary, Tony Blankley, has likened him to Churchill, de Gaulle, Eisenhower, even Gandhi. (“I knew there would be snickering,” Blankley says.) Beneath the hyperbole, however, is an undeniable fact: undeniable by conservatives and liberals alike. The surprise of the 104th Congress is how effective an executive Newt Gingric

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The Executive

 In the last four months, House Speaker Newt Gingrich has compared himself to a variety of Capitol Hill forebears: Nicholas Longworth, House speaker during the 1920s; Henry Clay; and the leaders of the Radical Republicans who dominated Congress after the Civil War. His press secretary, Tony Blankley, has likened him to Churchill, de Gaulle, Eisenhower, even Gandhi. (“I knew there would be snickering,” Blankley says.) Beneath the hyperbole, however, is an undeniable fact: undeniable by conservatives and liberals alike. The surprise of the 104th Congress is how effective an executive Newt Gingri

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The Executive

Fred Barnes on the rise and rise of Newt Gingrich.

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