columnist

I don't wish to join Isaac in piling on Matthew Continetti's love letter to Sarah Palin in the Weekly Standard. Wait. Let me re-phrase that. I do wish to join Isaac in piling on Matthew Continetti's love letter to Sarah Palin in the Weekly Standard. I know I shouldn't but I can't resist. Here's a passage that gives you an inkling of the method Continetti used to compile his argument: Whenever the arbiters of educated opinion witness the emergence of a populist leader, they spew insults.

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Post Mortem

Several years back, I worked as an editor at The Washington Post, and I still have good friends there. So it is with a combination of sadness and astonishment that I've watched the paper's precipitous editorial decline over the last few years. Lately it seems that hardly a week passes without some controversy arising--further embarrassing revelations about the salons, a shoddily researched editorial*, an online post by a columnist filled with falsehoods and undisclosed conflicts.

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Matthew Yglesias thinks the health care industry should shut up and take what the Democrats are offering, because they'll never get a better deal. I'm not sure he really has their best interests at heart, but he's almost certainly right. Peter Orszag thinks you should exercise more and eat right--and shows you how it's done. Ezra Klein thinks liberals should learn the difference between holding a seat in the Senate and getting that senator's vote. Igor Volsky thinks Susan Collins should make up her mind about what she really wants out of legislation.

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Liberal pundits, Defense Secretary Robert Gates, and National Security Advisor James Jones are in agreement: General Stanley McChrystal, commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, was wrong to give public voice to his views about the best way forward in that beleaguered country.

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Arthur Miller By Christopher Bigsby (Harvard University Press, 739 pp., $35) I. Arthur Miller could hardly have hoped for a more sympathetic biographer than Christopher Bigsby. He is the director of the Arthur Miller Centre for American Studies at the University of East Anglia, and the author of a long commentary on Miller’s work and a book-length interview with the playwright.

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I didn't comment on Post columnist Anne Applebaum's first short web piece in defense of Roman Polanski. Among its many flaws, it claimed that there was "evidence" that Polanski believed the girl he statutorily raped was older (in fact, he stated under oath that he knew she was 13),  and it failed to disclose that Applebaum's husband, Radoslaw Sikorski, is a Polish minister who,  in his official role, was appealing to U.S. authorities to drop the proceedings against Polanski. But Applebaum's followup is really too much to ignore.

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Newsmax columnist calls for military coup to oust President Obama: There is a remote, although gaining, possibility America’s military will intervene as a last resort to resolve the “Obama problem.” Don’t dismiss it as unrealistic. America isn’t the Third World. If a military coup does occur here it will be civilized. That it has never happened doesn’t mean it wont. Describing what may be afoot is not to advocate it.

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It’s now widely believed that the global recession is coming to an end, but the path out has been far from typical: This time around, China, not the U.S. has led the global recovery. With its $600 billion stimulus package and with banks lending with abandon, China has become the engine of global manufacturing and industrial activity.

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Why Is Obama Repeating Bush’s Iraq Mistakes…in Afghanistan? by Michael Crowley The Financial World’s Most Influential Columnist Is a Trash-Talking, Borderline Inscrutable Genius Who Makes You Sleep Badly at Night, by Julia Ioffe What Doctors Really Think About Health Care Reform, by Harold Pollack Galston: Unemployment Numbers May Put Democrats out of Work, by William Galston What Did It Mean to Die in the Warsaw Ghetto?

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Call of the Wolf

Long before Martin Wolf became the chief economics columnist for the Financial Times, he wrote the newspaper letters--lots and lots of letters. It was the early 1980s, the height of the Thatcher era, and Wolf was running research at a think tank in London that was sympathetic to the government's pro-trade agenda.

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