Constitution

This piece has been updated throughout to reflect breaking news in advance of the president's 11 a.m. speech.

READ MORE >>

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a great American. She was a pioneer in the women’s rights legal movement, co-founding its first journal and lecturing on the topic as Columbia’s first tenured female law professor (my father was in her first-ever class, and recalls her as a great teacher). She was the American Civil Liberties Union’s general counsel after founding its Women’s Rights Project.

READ MORE >>

The fatal flaw in the Obama administration's defense of metadata collection.

READ MORE >>

Is the Constitution an imperfect document that has led to some combination of inefficiency (as the left argues) and a lack of democratic accountability (as the right argues)?  Is it the Constitution that has been largely responsible for the problems of Barack Obama's presidency?

READ MORE >>

Three Ways Obama Could Raise the Debt Ceiling On His Own

The controversial, risky options if Congress doesn't act

A law professor lays out the least unconstitutional options for resolving a national crisis 

READ MORE >>

The biggest burden of being president is surely having to make decisions that will lead to people being killed and maimed in war: American soldiers who die decades before their time, innocent civilians in enemy countries, even enemy soldiers who rarely bear any moral responsibility for the decisions that make their countries our enemies.

READ MORE >>

I have a pretty broad view of presidential power to use military force abroad without congressional authorization. On that view, which is close to the past views of the Office of Legal Counsel, the planned use of military force in Syria is a constitutional stretch that will push presidential war unilateralism beyond where it has gone before. There are many reasons why it is a stretch even under OLC precedents.

READ MORE >>

Is the Filibuster Unconstitutional?

The Founding Fathers might not approve of today's Senate

The Founding Fathers might not approve of today's Senate.

READ MORE >>

The case of Bradley Manning is not just about a soldier who slipped documents to WikiLeaks. Prosecutors have embraced a logic that could apply the death penalty to civilans who leak to the New York Times.

READ MORE >>

Southern Comfort

By his own account, George Allen didn’t have much fun in his first and only term in the U.S. Senate, which, he once complained, moves “at the pace of a wounded sea slug.” Even less fun, however, was the dramatic flameout that took place during his 2006 campaign for reelection. First, New Republic reporter Ryan Lizza discovered a high school yearbook photo featuring a teenage Allen with a Confederate flag pin attached to his collar. Then, a few months later, Allen was caught on tape calling a South Asian Democratic campaign worker “macaca.” Suddenly, Allen had a race problem.

READ MORE >>

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR