David Card

Obama Occupies Wall Street
December 06, 2011

President Obama spoke today about economic inequality and the plight of the middle class more forcefully than he ever has before. He gave the speech in Osawatomie, Kansas, site of Theodore Roosevelt's "New Nationalism" speech in 1910.

Number of the Day
August 06, 2010

Everyone wants money. But is the arrival of immigrants looking to bolster their earnings in the United States making things worse for the people already here? Immigration is estimated to decrease natives' wage between:   zero and nine percent   Research in this field is far from definitive, but despite important contributions made by others, two men dominate the debate over the impact of immigrants on wages--George Borjas, of Harvard, and Berkeley's David Card. Card's research suggests that immigrants do not lower natives' wages.

Myth of the Day: Benefits Make People Lazy
July 01, 2010

Sharron Angle, the Republican trying to unseat Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, made herself an easy political target when she told an interviewer that cutting unemployment benefits was the right thing to do: RALSTON: How would you have voted on that bill to extend unemployment benefits? ANGLE: I would have voted no, because the truth about it is that they keep extending these unemployment benefits to the point where people are afraid to go out and get a job because the job doesn't pay as much as the unemployment benefit does.

Freaks and Geeks; How Freakonomics is ruining the dismal science.
April 02, 2007

Related Links: Steven Levitt's response to Scheiber's argument, and Scheiber's response to Levitt. One of the few papers I actually read as a grad student was written by a pair of economists named Josh Angrist and Alan Krueger. In the early '90s, Angrist and Krueger set off to resolve a question that had been gnawing at economists for decades: Does going to school increase your future wages? Intuitively, it seemed obvious that it did. When you compared the salaries of, say, Ph.D.s with those of high-school dropouts, the grad-school set almost always did better.

Freaks and Geeks
April 02, 2007

One of the few papers I actually read as a grad student was written by a pair of economists named Josh Angrist and Alan Krueger. In the early '90s, Angrist and Krueger set off to resolve a question that had been gnawing at economists for decades: Does going to school increase your future wages? Intuitively, it seemed obvious that it did. When you compared the salaries of, say, Ph.D.s with those of high-school dropouts, the grad-school set almost always did better. The question was whether education accounted for the difference.