George Soros

Terry McAuliffe's Campaign Encapsulates How Democrats Fundraise Now. (Of Course.)
November 04, 2013

Terry McAuliffe is, as usual, on the vanguard of fundraising trends in the Democratic Party.

In Washington, Marijuana Proponents Outspent Opponents 400 to 1
November 16, 2012

On October 31, a six-minute video titled “Chapel Chat with Evangelina Holy” appeared on YouTube. Despite the blurry footage and poor audio, the title character is a dead ringer for Dana Carvey’s “Church Lady” character from “Saturday Night Live.” In Carvey’s voice, Holy reads a letter from a viewer worried about marijuana legalization ballot initiatives in Colorado, Washington, and Oregon.

How Human Rights Became our Ideology
November 16, 2012

The modern idea of human rights was only created after World War II. In the next half-century, it became a global movement.

Mock on, Maureen Dowd: Why She’s Right About the Neo-cons
September 17, 2012

In the twilight years of the New Left, revolutionaries would regularly parse their adversaries’ statements for indications of “objective racism.” Even the slightest irregularity—calling someone’s thoughts “dark”—could unleash a volley of accusations.

Sheldon Adelson and the Jew Card
August 21, 2012

Can you criticize Republican mega-donor Sheldon Adelson without being accused of anti-Semitism?

Paul Krugman, Ted Cruz, and the Rage of the Golfing Class
August 01, 2012

Paul Krugman has posted a blog item observing, with some amusement, that Ted Cruz, Texas’s Tea Party-favored GOP Senate nominee, is a man who believes that there is a global plot, led by George Soros, to eliminate golf courses. It’s true! (Not that Soros wants to eliminate golf courses, but that Cruz has said he does.) What Krugman may not know, and what I learned from hard experience, is that golf is the very hottest of hot buttons to America’s business class. Regulate my company; tax my seven-figure income if you must.

Rage Of The Golfing Class
August 01, 2012

Paul Krugman has posted a blog item observing, with some amusement, that Ted Cruz, Texas's Tea Party-favored GOP Senate nominee, is a man who believes that there is a global plot, led by George Soros, to eliminate golf courses. It's true! (Not that Soros wants to eliminate golf courses, but that Cruz has said he does.) What Krugman may not know, and what I learned from hard experience, is that golf is the very hottest of hot buttons to America's business class. Regulate my company; tax my seven-figure income if you must.

Those Guys? Never Seen ’Em Before.
July 30, 2012

As Republicans have ramped up on their attack on Barack Obama as a wannabe socialist who doesn’t believe that successful businessmen are responsible for their own fortunes, I’ve been struck by an odd and little-noticed countervailing push: the desire by some conservative writers to disassociate their side from triumphant capitalists. I spotted it a few weeks ago in Nick Lemann’s New Yorker review of several books on inequality, including my colleague Tim Noah’s The Great Divergence and Spoiled Rotten: How the Politics of Patronage Corrupted the Once Noble Democratic Party and Now Threatens t

Citizens United? Don’t Worry Your Pretty Heads About It
July 23, 2012

Everyone loves a good counter-intuitive story, but Washington loves one sort in particular: the kind that assures us all that something we’ve been led to believe was a worrisome problem is, in fact, not all that big a deal after all, thus allowing us to return to watching “Veep” or “The Newsroom.” Yesterday’s New York Times Magazine offered a classic of this form, a Matt Bai piece arguing that the Citizens United ruling of 2010 is not nearly as responsible for the boom in campaign spending by outside groups as those whiny goo-goo types make it out to be: The oft-repeated narrative of 2012 goe

The Operator
April 20, 2012

Before 2013 begins, catch up on the best of 2012. From now until the New Year, we will be re-posting some of The New Republic’s most thought-provoking pieces of the year. Enjoy. In early 2010, Karl Rove convened a group of businessmen for lunch at a private club in Dallas. The guests included some of the richest and most influential people in Texas. T. Boone Pickens, the corporate raider from Amarillo, was there, as was Harlan Crow, the prodigal son of Trammell Crow, the most prominent real estate developer in the country in his day.

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