Germany

When the Big Four Met
January 01, 1970

This article was originally published on December 24th, 1919 This article is a chapter in a book soon to be published by Harcourt, Brace & Howe. The writer was the principal representative of the British Treasury at the Paris Peace Conference and sat as deputy for the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the Supreme Economic Council up to June 7, 1919.

The Hill Country of Lyndon Johnson
March 14, 1964

Where the president came from.

Can de Gaulle Do it?
March 02, 1963

His "twilight" has been proclaimed many times.

A European Union Is Still Our Best Hope
April 19, 1954

James King argues in favor of a European Defense Community.

Europe the Battleground
September 24, 1951

Michael Straight makes an early case for European Union.

The Week
July 26, 1948

Policy, Not Tactics, Needed in Berlin The real issue of the Berlin crisis has now become clear.

Poison Gas in This War
April 27, 1942

WHAT HAS HAPPENED to gas warfare? Will gas be used before the war ends? These questions have been asked for the past two year and it is more important than ever now for us to know the answers. If gas is to be used, we must be prepared for it. If there is little chance of chemical warfare, we need not worry about gas masks, decontamination materials and all the complicated and expensive business of gas defense, but may use our energy for other important work. Until Japan entered the war the question, “Why hasn’t gas been used?” was a good one.

I Was There But I Didn’t See It Happen
November 04, 1940

During WWII, Mary McCarthy laments that "the American papers have been serviced by a mass of amateur armchair political philosophers."

I Have a Thing to Tell You: II
March 17, 1937

 THE HOUR had come: along the station platform there was a flurry of excitement in the crowd, a light flashed, the porters moved along the quay. I turned and looked up the tracks. The train was sweeping down on us. It bore down swiftly, sweeping in around the edges of the Zoölogic Gardens, the huge snout of the locomotive looming bluntly, the fenders touched with trimmings of bright green. The great machine steamed hotly past and halted. The dull line of the coaches was "broken vividly in the middle with the glittering red of the Mitropa dining car. We swung to action.

The Week
November 11, 1936

PRESIDENT Roosevelt’s overwhelming victory promises to change the face of American political life. Even those expert observers who predicted a landslide did not envisage the unprecedented majority, both in popular vote and the electoral college, that he rolled up. As early as eleven o’clock on election night, when the first returns indicated a Roosevelt victory in every one of the doubtful states, and a popular majority of perhaps 9,000,000, leading Republican politicians and newspapers began to concede that their cause was hopeless; only the incredible John D. M.

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