Harold Ford Jr

Nowhere Man
February 17, 2010

"Southern voters are interested in solutions,” said Harold Ford Jr. in 2003. “They can spot a fake.” Perhaps this explains Ford’s subsequent decision to decamp from the South in search of a more gullible electorate. Having lost a 2006 Senate race in Tennessee, Ford is now all but officially running in New York. His efforts to date offer a fascinating character study. All politicians, to varying degrees, have pliable beliefs that must bend and twist to mesh with political surroundings that change over time.

Nowhere Man
February 17, 2010

"Southern voters are interested in solutions,” said Harold Ford Jr. in 2003. “They can spot a fake.” Perhaps this explains Ford’s subsequent decision to decamp from the South in search of a more gullible electorate. Having lost a 2006 Senate race in Tennessee, Ford is now all but officially running in New York. His efforts to date offer a fascinating character study. All politicians, to varying degrees, have pliable beliefs that must bend and twist to mesh with political surroundings that change over time.

Who Wants To Be A Commerce Secretary?
February 17, 2009

Commerce Secretary was already a second-tier cabinet position. After Bill Richardson and Judd Gregg's withdrawals, it's got even less cachet. So why am I not surprised that, per NBC's Chuck Todd (via Politico Playbook), former Tennessee Congressman Harold Ford Jr is a leading candidate? Last I'd heard, Ford was considering a run for Tennessee Governor in 2010. That was an exciting prospect (along with Alabama's Artur Davis, Ford would be the second African-American gubernatorial candidate in a Southern state in 2010), but, to me at least, also an unlikely one.