Humphrey Bogart

Lauren Bacall Was a Liberal Idol in a Rabidly Anti-Communist Hollywood
August 14, 2014

With her husband Humphrey Bogart, she resisted the studios' shameful blacklisting.

From the Stacks: "Journey into the Night"
September 23, 1946
July 23, 2013

In honor of Raymond Chandler's birthday, our 1946 review of the film version of his novel "The Big Sleep," starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall.

David Thomson on Films: Happy Birthday to an American Icon We No Longer Deserve
May 08, 2012

From time to time these days, one meets young people—film students even—who can’t quite place Gary Cooper. Come May 13, he will have been dead for 51 years; and on May 7—the day I’m writing—he was born in 1901, up in Montana.

TNR Film Classics: 'The Big Sleep' (September 23, 1946)
February 18, 2011

The Big Sleep is an unsentimental, surrealist excitement in which most of the men in Hollywood’s underworld are murdered and most of the women go for an honest but not unwilling private sleuth (Humphrey Bogart).

The BACKLOT: ‘Breathless’ at 50
May 27, 2010

As Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless comes up for reissue (50 years after its debut), all too many film writers lapse into nostalgia for their own fondness. In The Huffington Post, Patty Zohn offers an enjoyable essay about how she went to Paris (in 1970) and found the film still playing, and how she saw herself in Jean Seberg’s Patricia—the student soaking up the New Wave and the old Paris. Well, I’ve met Ms.

Changes
May 21, 2010

Two in the Wave Lorber Films Looking for Eric IFC Films No movement in any nation’s film history has had a greater effect, at home and abroad, than the French New Wave. Beginning in the late 1950s and cresting through the 1960s, it not only brought forth new and invaluable talents: it altered in some degree the expectations of audiences. Much has naturally been written about the New Wave.

Secrets
April 07, 2010

The Eclipse Magnolia Pictures Handsome Harry Paladin Bluebeard Strand Releasing   A candle is lighted in the dark. This is the opening shot of The Eclipse, hinting at mystery. The next shot reveals that the candle is a taper on a table in a large hotel restaurant. Thus in its first few seconds the film suggests that it will inhabit two spheres, the mysterious and the diurnal, and that the two will virtually overlap. This Irish film was adapted by the playwright Conor McPherson, who has directed several films, and by Billy Roche from Roche’s original story.

Stanley Kauffmann on Films
October 10, 2009

Disgrace Paladin The Other Man Image Entertainment   J.M. Coetzee's novel Disgrace has been made into a film that, in good measure, is faithful to it. Along with the admiration that obviously drew them to the book, the film-makers had to deal with some heavy data. Coetzee is a Nobel laureate; Disgrace won a lofty British award called the Booker Prize; an English newspaper poll lately named Disgrace as the best novel of the last twenty-five years.

The Rescuer
October 28, 2002

A Race Against Death: Peter Bergson, America, and the Holocaust by David S. Wyman and Rafael Medoff (The New Press, 269 pp., $26.95) Twenty-five years ago, while researching Holocaust history for the Joint Distribution Committee in New York, and as I was preparing to immigrate to Israel, I came across a clipping from The New York Times from 1936.

To Die For
August 13, 2001

Celebrity, spectacle and violence in the Hollywood drama of Robert Blake and Bonny Lee Bakley.

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