Johnny Depp

'Transcendence' Is So Bad You'll Start to Feel Sorry for Johnny Depp
April 17, 2014

Johnny Depp, Morgan Freeman, and Rebecca Hall are trapped in this terrible movie.

Johnny Depp's Delusions About Why 'The Lone Ranger' Flopped
August 06, 2013

Variety has a horrifying article—"horrifying" because of the levels of self-deception and insanity it depicts—about The Lone Ranger, the biggest catastrophe of Hollywood's summer.

Depp v. Pitt: The Dual Fate of the Leading Man
July 09, 2013

They have things in common. Johnny is only a few months older than Brad. They were country boys from the rough northern edge of the South: Johnny Depp was born in Owensboro, Kentucky; and Brad Pitt was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

David Thomson on Films: How Johnny Depp and Tim Burton Became Shadows of Their Former Selves
May 15, 2012

The only reason to see Dark Shadows is to discover how dire and pointless—how flat-out dreadful—a movie can be even when it has Tim Burton, Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Helena Bonham Carter attached to its flimsy pretext. This is one more vampiric concoction, the total budget for which (apparently $105 million) might have sustained 100 worthwhile, independent projects by new directors.

David Thomson on Films: Who Killed Jack Sparrow?
May 21, 2011

The other day, I was talking to another film critic about the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise. This was in the dawn before the fourth film, On Stranger Tides, had opened. My friend said he had seen the three previous films, but he couldn’t recall a single scene or incident from them. “And yet, when we see the fourth,” I suggested, “everything will seem entirely predictable and familiar from the past.” Oblivion without surprise: I suppose that’s a definition of both the experience of Alzheimer’s and our relationship with that saucy (if not over-sauced) Jack Sparrow.

Triumph of the Gypsies
May 20, 2010

Django Reinhardt, the Gypsy jazz guitarist whose centennial fell early on this year's calendar, infuriated his closest friend and best collaborator, Stephane Grappelli, with stereotypically Gypsy-ish bad behavior that only his sublimely atypical but deeply Gypsy-ish music could excuse. Early in the mid-'90s, when Grappelli was in his eighties but still playing regularly at the Blue Note in Manhattan, I did a fairly long interview with him in which he said, emphatically, "Django made me very angry. Django would not be there--we could not find him anywhere. He drank every day.

Execution Without Conviction
July 08, 2009

On a Wednesday night in San Francisco, opening night, in a theater no more than half full, the truth was as inescapable as rain at a picnic. Johnny Depp just wasn’t cutting it. He wasn’t even making the attempt. Once again, Michael Mann had poured his nearly liquid talent over a gangster picture without ever thinking to ask himself why. That oddly vague title Public Enemies--why isn’t it called Johnny D. or just Dillinger?--was turning into a startlingly detached and affectless movie.

The Movie Review: 'Public Enemies'
July 02, 2009

It's taken countless hours of TV crime-drama ("Crime Story," "Miami Vice") and nearly a dozen feature films (Heat, Collateral, Miami Vice again), but in John Dillinger, Michael Mann may finally have found an ideal vessel for his particular vision of masculine cool: stylish, charismatic, unflappable, adept at violence but not hungry for it. After spending nine years in prison for his rookie robbery (a grocery-store heist that allegedly netted him $50), Dillinger emerged in May 1933 to launch perhaps the most storied crime spree in American history.

Is Jonah Hill The New Johnny Depp?
May 14, 2008

...or the new Richard Grieco? Entertainment Weekly:  21 Jump Street by way of...Jonah Hill?! Yes, it's true: The breakout Superbad comic and Judd Apatow acolyte is in negotiations to develop a movie adaptation of the popular '80s TV show starring Johnny Depp. But wait, there's some bad news: It hasn't been decided whether Hill will actually star in the movie, but Sony confirms that he'll work on the screenplay and serve as executive producer. Not star? What a waste that would be.

A Close Shave
February 27, 2008

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street(DreamWorks) ForeignersBy Caryl Phillips (Knopf, 235 pp., $24.95)  Records of Shelley, Byron, and the AuthorBy Edward John Trelawny (New York Review Books, 308 pp., $12.95)   I. As Sweeney Todd croons to his razor, “My friend, my faithful friend,” more in love with its sharp blade than with Mrs. Lovett, his partner in crime, you may find yourself wondering what it is about opera and its ubiquitous vengeful barbers.