Liberalism

Teddy Roosevelt, Not-So-Great Reformer

What Washington-focused liberals miss about Progressivism

The liberal consensus is that Teddy Roosevelt was a great progressive. But his popularity makes it hard to see an alternative: progressivism with power not in the hands of corporate managers, or oligarchs. 

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A new Harper's essay attacks Obama from the left—and is incoherent about the vast gap between liberals and conservatives

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Arizona's Anti-Gay Bill Failed. Good. But Did You Hear About Arkansas?

Liberals have a problem with bright shiny objects

By all means, celebrate the Arizona gay-rights victory. But don't forget about other issues in other states.

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In The New York Times on Sunday, Amy Harmon has a long, fascinating, and superbly researched piece about the fight over genetically engineered crops in Hawaii. Harmon follows the journey of a Hawaii county councilman named Greggor Ilagan as he navigates his colleagues and a liberal constituency that are both strongly opposed to the genetic engineering of food.

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It's time for some perspective on papal hype

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It has been a rough two months for the Affordable Care Act and its defenders. Having spent years fighting ridiculous allegations about socialized medicine and "death panels," supporters of near-universal coverage now face something different. The performance failures in the rollout of healthcare.gov have triggered cries of "I told you so!" from some liberals. This wouldn’t have happened, they say, if only Obama had supported some form of single-payer plan, such as Medicare for all.

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There’s a term of art that the Obama White House uses to describe its neurotic supporters who instantly race to the worst-case scenario: They are known as “bed-wetters.” Two months into the dysfunctional life of healthcare.gov, however, that seems a perfectly appropriate physiological reaction.

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Christie's moderate views on certain social issues would do little to change things. His severe views on fiscal and foreign policy are another story. 

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Is a new, young left really on the rise? A few weeks ago, Peter Beinart wrote a long online essay which argued strongly in the affirmative. It drew a lot of attention—20,000 “Likes” and almost 5,000 tweets, at last count. And it made a lot of the progressives who read it feel better about politics than at any time since Mitt Romney learned 47 percent was actually the percentage of his popular vote.

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The decline of an American pastime and the rise of a liberal silent majority.

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