MIT

Covering politics isn't all about the numbers, either.

READ MORE >>

Please, Herr Krugman, May I Have Another?

How America’s favorite liberal stokes German masochism

Krugman loves to insult the Germans, and they love to be insulted by him.

READ MORE >>

Which basketball players are supporting Obama? Plus, the NBA's foremost statistician tells us why he backs Romney.

READ MORE >>

Moralizing Technology: Understanding and Designing the Morality of Things  By Peter-Paul Verbeek  (University of Chicago Press, 183 pp., $25) JUST WEST OF SEOUL, on a man-made island in the Yellow Sea, a city is rising. Slated for completion by 2015, Songdo has been meticulously planned by engineers and architects and lavishly financed by money from the American real estate company Gale International and the investment bank Morgan Stanley.

READ MORE >>

Yesterday, the Supreme Court took on the constitutionality of Obamacare’s individual mandate—and in the opinion of nearly every observer, things did not go well. It’s hard to say how much the Supremes will be influenced by the Solicitor General’s underwhelming performance, especially since most legal analysts seem to think the mandate, regardless of how well the administration defended it, is perfectly constitutional. But for a moment, let’s imagine a possible outcome of the case: The Court strikes down the mandate but upholds the rest of the law.

READ MORE >>

In the last years of the nineteenth century, Charles Dow created an index of 12 leading industrial companies. Almost none of them exist today. While General Electric remains an industrial giant, the U.S. Leather Company, American Cotton Oil, and others have long since disappeared into bankruptcy or consolidation. Today, the Dow Jones includes giant corporations that hadn’t even been created when Ronald Reagan first sat in the Oval Office.

READ MORE >>

Editor's note: On Friday, Jon Cohn wrote about a new House Republican report about the Affordable Care Act -- and why one of its central claims was wrong. Among the sources he cited was Jonathan Gruber, the MIT economist who has advised policy-makers, including some of the ACA's architects. But Gruber found several other flaws in the report. What follows is his analysis. A new report from the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is making headlines because of four claims it makes about the Affordable Care Act (ACA). But some of these claims are wrong-headed.

READ MORE >>

Just in time for Tuesday night's Republican presidential debate, NBC News is out with a story reminding everybody of just how closely the architects of Obamacare modeled their efforts on Romneycare. The story, by Michael Isikoff, cites White House records showing that three key analysts who worked on the Massachusetts reforms met with administration officials at least a dozen times.

READ MORE >>

Note This

Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information Before the Modern Age By Ann M. Blair (Yale University Press, 397 pp., $45) In 1945, in an article called “As We May Think,” Vannevar Bush evoked a specter for the modern age beyond the bomb: information overload.

READ MORE >>

National Review's Kevin Williamson has a post, responding to me, entitled, "What Does Jonathan Chait Know about Science?": Scientific disputes are highly specialized, and meaningful participation in them requires a great deal of non-generalist knowledge. I’m generally skeptical of argument from credential, but there’s a time for it. For instance, a great number of scientists have a particular view of global warming. Richard Lindzen has reservations about that view. Professor Lindzen is an atmospheric physicist a full-on professor at MIT.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR