New York

The Murderous Motor
July 07, 1926

Complete figures dealing with automobile accidents in 1925 have recently been made public. They reveal that safety on the highway, or the present lack of it, may now fairly be reckoned as one of the major problems of the day. Last year more than 22,000 persons were killed in or by automobiles, and something like three quarters of a million injured. The number of dead is almost half as large as the list of fatalities during the nineteen months of America’s participation in the Great War. In 60 percent of the cases, the person killed was a pedestrian struck by a car.

The Week
July 07, 1926

After leaving Pennsylvania, the next stop is Illinois! The searchlight of investigation is now to be turned on expenditures in the recent Senatorial primary in that state. The Senatorial committee which has been looking into the Pennsylvania orgy decided some time ago that as soon as Congress adjourns it will move to Chicago and continue its activities there. Since then Senator Caraway has made charges on the floor of the Senate which if confirmed will make the stigma attached to Illinois politicians quite as serious as that now clings to the Pennsylvanians.

Correspondence
July 07, 1926

The Plight of the British Miners Sir: We are enclosing an appeal which has just come to us from the five men whose names are signed to it, with the request that we ask you if you will not give it prominent place in your pages. We gladly ask this of you, first of all because of our confidence in the men whose names are appended to the appeal. Miss Evelyn Preston, who has just come to this country to represent the British Committee of Women for Relief of the Miners’ Wives and Children, was also asked to try to bring this appeal before the churches of the country.

Are the Republicans a Party?
March 19, 1924

IT is so easy to perceive decay in an old political party that the very fact causes doubt of the value of the evidence.

The Great Sugar Mystery
April 17, 1923

 A FEW weeks ago the Department of Commerce issued a newspaper statement about sugar. It was highly statistical and painfully dull in style, but it contained a few words destined to have results sensational enough for anybody. “Production for 1923 only 125,000 tons higher than last year,” said a note at the beginning.

The Whirling Pyramid
November 03, 1920

Omens these: In Paterson, the silk city, little third and fourth class shops are flooded with fine silks to be sold at any price; there has been a panic in silk. A year ago a butcher got $1.35 a pound for his raw calf hides and today he is lucky to get 25 cents; the bottom has fallen out of the leather market. The sign of the night rider appears in the South. The farming industry in convention at Washington demands unlimited federal credit to enable the South to sit on its cotton until the price is 40 cents again, and the West to hold its wheat for $3.00 a bushel; else all are ruined.

Baseball On Trial
October 20, 1920

The White Sox players who took a dive at the World Series.

Mr. Burleson, Junker in Vain
April 19, 1919

HAVING discharged the President of the National Association of Letter Carriers and the President of the National Rural Letter Carriers’ Association and the President of the Railway Mail Association and the Secretary-Treasurer of the National Federation of Postal Employees, Mr.

Democracy for Law Breakers
March 08, 1919

WHILE the world is being made safe for democracy and the law-abiding, democracy itself is being made safe for the lawbreaker. One after another, our penal and correctional institutions are experimenting with inmate self-government; the criminal is being painlessly inoculated with group consciousness.

Lord Charnwood's Lincoln
November 25, 1916

Abraham Lincoln by Lord Charnwood. Makers of the Nineteenth Century Series. New York: Henry Holt & Co. $2.00. The frankness and commonsense of Lord Charnwood's treatment of much debated matters in our political history may be illustrated by a passage relating to Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence. That was not a very candid state paper, he says, and the sentiments aroused for it afterwards by the popularity of Jefferson not wholly free from humbug. But the critics of the equality clause misconceive it.

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