Photos

Rwanda's Open Wounds

Tens of thousands of amputees serve as living reminders of the 1994 genocide

Reminders of Rwanda's genocide are everywhere today, in the form of tens of thousands who survived the mass slaughter but were left permanently maimed.

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Afghan Tales, a traveling photo exhibition, aims to counter the stereotypical vision of Afghanistan with images of daily life in the war-torn country.

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A discomfiting photo gallery

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This is—or should that be “These are”?—how the future of photography might look. The history of the medium, in common with most technologies, is largely about ever-increasing speed. In the nineteenth century, exposure times were so long that moving people and objects became either blurred or completely invisible. But it wasn’t only shutter speeds that got faster. The intervals between pictures were also reduced, from the cumbersome preparation of individual collodion wet-plate negatives to rolls of film containing 36 frames.

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The strange, stunning photographs of the Point Blank Project present a new view of handguns.

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It is disturbing to see Beyoncé putting on a sad-face because the topic, for an hour, was the Holocaust. But it's also appropriate.

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The city has erased more than just graffiti.

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In a boxing match, the combatants are rarely more than a couple of feet apart. Even the punch that separates them absolutely—the moment marking the difference between victory and defeat—unites them in brutal intimacy. That’s one of the reasons why boxing is relatively easy to photograph.

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Unlike another despot known for looking at things, Putin's gaze always seems to fall on objects off-camera.

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According to Time magazine's political-personality quiz, anyway.

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