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Jacob S. Hacker is Professor of Political Science and Co-Director of the Center for Health, Economic, and Family Security at U.C. Berkeley.

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Alan Brinkley is the provost and a professor of history at Columbia University, as well as a National Book Award-winning author.  I really don't like "town hall meeting" debates. First, they are (in this context) populist gimmicks to test a skill that has nothing to do with being president.

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Alan Brinkley is the provost and a professor of history at Columbia University, as well as a National Book Award-winning author. I doubt the first debate will make a decisive difference. There were no "There you go again" moments and no terrible blunders. Both candidates stuck to their talking points, and there was nothing very new about the debate other than the opportunity to contrast the two men more vividly than has been possible before. On the substance, I think Obama won, but not by much. He had a crisp and effective answer to the key question about the economy.

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Alan Brinkley--who is the provost and a professor of history at Columbia University, as well as a National Book Award-winning author--will be writing for us throughout the Republican convention.     There was a back-to-the-future quality to this year's Republican convention, at no time more so than on the last night.

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Alan Brinkley--who is the provost and a professor of history at Columbia University, as well as a National Book Award-winning author--will be writing for us throughout the Republican convention.     I guess the Democrats can't count on Sarah Palin to torpedo McCain's candidacy. If there is a danger, it is that her speech will overshadow his. After the really dreary and depressing session of yesterday, tonight was very successful, with two good speeches--the other by Giuliani.

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A Connection Made?

Alan Brinkley--who is the provost and a professor of history at Columbia University, as well as a National Book Award-winning author--will be writing for us throughout the Republican convention.  One more thought from yesterday's convention in St. Paul: The most powerful speech came from Fred Thompson--an energy-less candidate in the primaries who finally seemed to summon some passion last night.

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Alan Brinkley--who is the provost and a professor of history at Columbia University, as well as a National Book Award-winning author--will be writing for us throughout the Republican convention.    After tonight's festivities--which, Thompson's speech excepted, were pretty dreary--the real puzzle of this convention to me is what McCain's strategy is at this critical juncture of his campaign. During the primaries, he pandered to the far right at every opportunity.

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Convention season is upon us. There will be clichés, giant flags, funny hats--and much, much whining about how these party-themed infomercials aren’t worth our time. But are there ways in which we could genuinely improve the content of the conventions? We asked a few friends of the magazine to offer their suggestions. Here’s James Galbraith, professor of economics and government at the University of Texas and author of The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market and Why Liberals Should Too.   Twenty years ago, I encountered in the halls of the Lyndon B.

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Near the midpoint of Hellboy II: The Golden Army, the titular demon is asked by his all-too-human girlfriend, “Do you need everyone to love you? Or am I enough?” The original Hellboy, which director Guillermo del Toro launched on an unsuspecting public in 2004, felt as though it would have been content with the latter option--the unconditional affection of comic-book and fantasy-film geeks, the ironic indie crowd, and an eclectic bag of viewers eager for something just a little different.

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David Greenberg is a professor of history and media studies at Rutgers and a contributing editor to The New Republic. Despite what you may have heard, there is nothing slow or delayed about Hillary Clinton's decision to wait until Saturday to formally concede the Democratic nomination--at least as a historical matter.

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