Senegal

Read parts one, two, three, four, and five of Zeke Emanuel's Africa diaries. Six boys sit on green plastic classroom chairs in gowns with their clothes neatly folded on a side table. Cloth booties cover their feet and lower leg. They smile nervously. They are waiting to be called for a medical circumcision. Eduardo says he is 16 years old, as is his friend sitting next to him. Why are they getting a circumcision? “For hygiene, and for HIV,” they tell us. And their classmates are getting one too. This is the Military Hospital in Maputo, Mozambique.

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Read part one of Zeke Emanuel's Africa Diaries here. About six hours after leaving Dakar, Senegal’s capital, we arrive in Kissan, a village of 526 people that lies in the Tambacounda Region. We left paved road about 30 miles ago. After bouncing on rutted, puddle-filled paths through the bush, we enter a collection of one-room huts made of cinder blocks with thatched roofs. Chickens, ducks, and goats roam the reddish-orange mud alleyways. Kissan is one of the hot spots for malaria, a deadly disease that mosquitoes carry and that killed 900,000 people last year alone.

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Aquacalypse Now

Our oceans have been the victims of a giant Ponzi scheme, waged with Bernie Madoff–like callousness by the world’s fisheries. Beginning in the 1950s, as their operations became increasingly industrialized--with onboard refrigeration, acoustic fish-finders, and, later, GPS--they first depleted stocks of cod, hake, flounder, sole, and halibut in the Northern Hemisphere.

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