South Carolina

Walter Mitty Lives!
September 08, 2009

Beleagured South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford explains himself to The Daily Beast: You know, everybody is assigned their own secret-agent mission in life. And at times the tricky part, the hard part, is finding out what that secret-agent mission is. Some of us do it early, some of us do it later in life. Sanford, Mark Sanford.

Jim Demint Hates America
July 09, 2009

That is, unless the South Carolina Senator meant his explicit comparison to Nazi Germany as a compliment... --Christopher Orr

Love Actually
June 27, 2009

"I never figured Sanford for anything like this," mused one of the governor’s constituents in The New York Times this week. Mark Sanford’s friends are aghast. His neighbors shake their heads. His community simply could not see it coming. The Internet is in convulsions: Who would have thought Sanford capable of this? Give it a rest. The man didn’t commit murder here. He’s in love. Anarchic, hurtful, but seemingly true love. Governor Sanford of South Carolina had what would, under ordinary circumstances, be considered an ideal romantic relationship in the 21st century.

You Say Appalachia, I Say Argentina (er, Updated)...
June 24, 2009

Granted, if you're the governor of a state, it is a little strange to disappear for almost a week without telling your staff your whereabouts or setting up any kind of contingency planning. As South Carolina's The State reports: S.C. Gov. Mark Sanford arrived in the Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport this morning, having wrapped up a seven-day visit to Buenos Aires, Argentina, he said.

A Presidential Nominating State Feels The Burn
December 22, 2008

The New York Times offers up Columbia, South Carolina as a snapshot of how the financial disaster hits mid-size cities. Evidently Columbia is a "microcosm of the nation over the last decade" on all kinds of economic indicators, and it's now suffering from an array of standard woes: Jobs are melting away, the recently revitalized downtown shows signs of degentrification, etc. But, of course, there's one way Columbia differs from other mid-sized cities.

Palin Saves Herself; Now Mccain Faces Reality
October 03, 2008

The good news for Republicans in last night's vice presidential debate is that Sarah Palin saved herself. Sure, her paper-thin grasp of policy issues and reliance on canned talking points was an embarrassment. She was barely able to cope with a question about the gravest responsibility of the presidency--the potential use of nukes. And many of her sharpest talking points--about funding US troops and the fiendish mainstream media--seemed tailored more for a conservative base already supporting her ticket anyway.

The TNR Q&A: James Clyburn
August 26, 2008

During the Democratic primary season, Congressman James Clyburn of South Carolina was the man to talk to about identity politics. As the Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama campaigns hurled suggestive and sometimes ugly statements at each other, Clyburn, the highest-ranking black member of Congress, spoke personally with the candidates and appeared on television numerous times to insist that cooler heads prevail, lest the Democrats lose their chance to take the White House.

The Martyrdom Of John Mccain, Part Two
July 28, 2008

In light of John McCain's recent the-papers-have-a-crush-on-the-other-boy victim act -- and its debunking -- I thought I'd reprint some of one of my favorite pieces of writing from this election, Jonathan Martin's deliciously tongue-in-cheek "The Martyrdom of John McCain," published right before the South Carolina primary. Make no mistake: The victim thing is no temporary, grasping-at-straws campaign strategy; it's McCain's bread and butter. Enjoy: COLUMBIA, S.C.

Taking A Dive
June 10, 2008

From a distance, it might seem that environmentalists should be crestfallen that the 2008 Climate Security Act--shorthanded as Lieberman-Warner after its lead sponsors in the Senate--went down in flames on the Senate floor on Friday. The bill, which would cap fossil fuel emissions in the United States above a certain level and ask industry to pay more for any excesses, was easily the most aggressive and comprehensive environmental reform ever to hit Congress. But the bipartisan plan to cut U.S.

The Olympics Have Taken China Down A Notch
May 01, 2008

  At the start of the Tibet uprising, I mused that the Olympics--far from being a Chinese propaganda coup, as envisioned by Beijing--might actually wreck China's image abroad. Now, John Pomfret at PostGlobal thinks this is indeed happening (it's worth reading the piece): Move over ugly American, make room for the ugly Chinese. ... For the past decade, China's "soft power" has helped fuel Beijing's rise by attempting to assuage fears of an expansionist China. ... But now across the globe China is dropping in the polls. It's true.

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