South Carolina

Is John In Trouble?
and
March 15, 2007

Edwards fading in South Carolina... --Isaac Chotiner

Smelly Nelly
February 12, 2007

IN THE SUMMER of 2004, when the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth attacked John Kerry with a series of ads challenging his service in Vietnam, the hapless candidate had a defender across the aisle: John McCain. Shortly after the ads hit the airwaves, the Arizona senator called the smear campaign “dishonest and dishonorable” and urged President Bush to condemn it.

Homegrown Terror
November 20, 2006

Redemptions: The Last Battle of the Civil War By Nicholas Lemann (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 257 pp., $24)   Colfax, Louisiana was scarcely a town in 1873. It was more a collection of buildings on a plantation owned by William Calhoun. As much as any site in the former Confederate South, however, Colfax came to embody the complex political dynamics of Reconstruction, and the troubling relation of terror and democracy in the history of the United States. Lying in the heart of the state's lush Red River Valley, Colfax was the newly designated seat of the newly created Grant Parish, carved out

Opportunism Knocks
September 06, 2004

To grasp the strangeness of the current rapprochement between President George W. Bush and Senator John McCain, you need to understand the saga of John Weaver, the political operative who brokered the peace. Long before many Democrats became Bush haters, Weaver was already there. As a chief strategist for John McCain's 2000 presidential campaign, he bore witness to the carnage of the primary in South Carolina, where Bush campaign proxies spread spurious rumors about their rival's venereal diseases, treasonous wartime behavior, and the black child he sired with a prostitute.

Lost Cause
August 02, 2004

Florence, South Carolina—On a Saturday afternoon not long ago, Walt Hilderman was standing in a soggy horse pasture here—a .75-caliber musket in one hand, a Confederate flag in the other. He was participating in a reenactment of an 1865 Civil War battle called the Skirmish at Gamble's Hotel. A retired police captain with bowed legs and a drooping silver moustache, Hilderman wore the rebel-gray uniform well. In fact, if you forgot he had been swigging from a bottle of Coke shortly before the battle, it wasn't hard to picture Hilderman fighting some 140 years earlier.

Lost Cause
August 02, 2004

Florence, South Carolina- On a Saturday afternoon not long ago, Walt Hilderman was standing in a soggy horse pasture here—a .75-caliber musket in one hand, a Confederate flag in the other. He was participating in a reenactment of an 1865 Civil War battle called the Skirmish at Gamble's Hotel. A retired police captain with bowed legs and a drooping silver moustache, Hilderman wore the rebel-gray uniform well. In fact, if you forgot he had been swigging from a bottle of Coke shortly before the battle, it wasn't hard to picture Hilderman fighting some 140 years earlier.

The Boss
August 02, 2004

Robert Shrum, John Kerry's chief strategist and speechwriter, is considered the poet laureate of populism--the man who injected the phrase "the people versus the powerful" into Democratic vernacular. Over his 35-year career, Shrum has been responsible for many of the memorable lines to leave the mouths of such Democratic eminences as Ted Kennedy, George McGovern, and Al Gore. But one of his most telling speeches won't ever be collected in an anthology of great oratory. For many years, Shrum plied his trade on behalf of Richard Gephardt.

Disciplinarian
February 16, 2004

Jason Zengerle on John Edwards' 2004 South Carolina campaign.

Disciplinarian
February 16, 2004

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA –– WHEN PEOPLE IMAGINE the typical John Edwards supporter, they probably imagine someone like Phil Phunn. As recently as January, Phunn was a Howard Dean man. But then one day last month Phunn wandered into an Edwards event in Iowa and heard the North Carolina senator deliver his now-famous stump speech. He was sold on the spot. “I just identified with him,” Phunn recalls. “We’re the same age, we’ve been through the same things, he just spoke to me in a way that Dean didn’t—and that was before the scream.” Phunn’s conversion was sudden—and life-changing, to a degree.

Southern Exposure
May 19, 2003

Ryan Lizza's 2003 look at the Democratic jockeying in the Palmetto state.

Pages