From the stacks

The founding father of yellow journalism, William Randolph Hearst, died 62 years ago today. For the occasion, we present this Hamilton Basso's tongue-in-cheek evaluation of all that is Hearst.

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When Alfred Hitchcock died, Mark Crispin Miller wrote this impassioned defense of Hitchcock's legacy against the onslaught of his critics, citing him as "among the greatest artists of this century."

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In 1936, Thomas Mann finally broke his silence on a new, Nazi Germany. Here, The New Republic editors' original statement in support of Mann's bold choice.

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A reflection on the grittier side of being one with nature, and whether Henry David Thoreau really enjoyed it as much as he claimed to.

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From the Stacks: “A Girl in Winter”

November 20, 1976

Philip Larkin would have been 91 today. In his honor, Joyce Carol Oates's review of his second novel, as originally published in The New Republic.

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Shirley Jackson died 48 years ago today. In her honor, her sharp-witted reflection on working retail, as originally published in The New Republic.

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Today marks 44 years since the beginning of the brutal, deranged murder spree instrumented by Charles Manson and his followers. Here, The New Republic's original review of Helter Skelter.

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On the 32nd anniversary of the closing of the Washington Star (and in light of the Post's surprise sale), our original reporting on the Star's demise.

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On the 204th anniversary of Lord Tennyson's birth, a review of Tennyson's biography, as originally published in The New Republic.

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On the anniversary of Guy de Maupassant's birth in 1850, The New Republic's 1926 review of two books chronicling his life: Guy de Maupassant, A Biographical Study, by Ernest Boyd, and The Life, Work and Evil Fate of Guy de Maupassant, by Richard Harborough Sherard.

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