Truman

Will the Pact Save Peace?
February 21, 1949

The North Atlantic pact, which involves one of the most fateful decisions in American history, is being discussed in a series of articles in the New Republic. Last week Captain B. H. Liddell Hart, noted British military expert, analyzed the defensibility of Western Europe, and in an editorial we gave our reasons for believing that the North Atlantic pact deserves support. The article below, by Blair Bolles, offering an argument against the plan, is published for its intrinsic interest.

The British-American Difference
September 24, 1945

NO PROBLEM OF first importance in international relations it less understood in the United States than the economic divergence between the United States and Great Britain. The sudden and unilateral cancellation of Lend-Lease by President Truman has led to a hasty attempt by foreign correspondents and commentators to explain the British situation. But most of these efforts are incomplete and have not sunk far into the American consciousness.

Atomic and Human Energy
August 27, 1945

The first use of the atomic bomb against a hostile population has, in spite of its stunning success as a weapon of war, brought forth expressions of guilt and horror from many parts of the world. These emotions have been felt even in the victorious nations, and even by persons who are glad on the whole that it was employed to bring the war to a quick end. They are probably less strong in the United States than in England, which has suffered the actual experience of indiscriminate devastation from the air. It is indeed difficult to justify use of an extreme form of the kind of weapon which hit

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