the University of Iowa

Mugabe and Me

At an arts festival in Zimbabwe, the show must go on—even when the main event has been banned by the police.

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One more reason to oppose Paul Ryan's voucherized Medicare program: Most elderly aren't able to make good consumer decisions.

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The Honor of Aleppo

Before 2013 begins, catch up on the best of 2012. From now until the New Year, we will be re-posting some of The New Republic’s most thought-provoking pieces of the year. Enjoy. I. Last November a protester on the outskirts of Damascus held up to the cameras a placard that mocked the people of Aleppo: “URGENT! ALEPPO REBELS—IN 2050!” It was hardly heroic, the caution of Aleppo, particularly against the background of a rebellion that had scorched Deraa and Hama and Homs and Banias and so many unheralded Syrian towns.

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Hope in a Scattering Time: A Life of Christopher Lasch By Eric Miller (Eerdmans, 394 pp., $32) In a moving tribute to Christopher Lasch written shortly after his death in 1994, Dale Vree, a Catholic convert and the editor of the New Oxford Review, wrote that “Calvinism was his true theological inspiration.” Lasch was certainly not one of the faithful.

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Suicide And Sexual Harassment

A most disturbing article in a recent issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education deals with the suicide of two professors at the University of Iowa, both of whom faced charges of sexual harassment. Arthur H. Miller, a prominent political scientist, was accused of offering female students good grades in return for fondling their breasts. Mark O. Weiger, a well-known oboist, evidently (like Mozart) possessed a taste for the scatological. Miller shot himself in a public park.

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Mobbed Up

The Wisdom of Crowds: Why the Many Are Smarter Than the Few and How Collective Wisdom Shapes Business, Economies, Societies, and Nations By James Surowiecki (Doubleday, 296 pp., $24.95) In the summer of 2003, analysts at the Department of Defense had an unusual idea. To predict important events in the world, including terrorist attacks, they would create a kind of market in which ordinary people could actually place bets.

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