World

Inside the Security Council: Miscellany
September 24, 2009

Disappointingly, Moamar Qaddafi didn't show up to speak for Libya at the security council this morning, although a Libyan representative did deliver a colorful speech demanding a permanent security council seat for his country and insisting that Israel to grant the IAEA open access to its Dimona nuclear facility. During the Libyan's remarks, Rahm Emanuel got up, walked across the room and sat down next to Congressman Bill Delahunt--who is a US delegate to this weeks' proceedings--throwing his arm around the Masschusetts Democrat and whispering in his ear. It was also interesting to see Hillary

Sarkozy Pushes on Iran, North Korea
September 24, 2009

This morning the UN security council unanimously passed a resolution echoing Barack Obama's vision of nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. It's hard to criticize this vision, but some conservatives have criticized Obama's vision for a world without nuclear weapons as naive. And, more specifically, some are complaining that the broad themes discussed here this morning amount to going soft on Iran and North Korea, who are not mentioned by name in the resolution approved by the council, and who went unmentioned in Obama's opening remarks.

Inside the Security Council, Cont'd
September 24, 2009

At the opening of this morning's special Security Council session on nukes, Barack Obama opened his remarks with this dramatic vision: As I said yesterday, this very institution was founded at the dawn of the atomic age, in part because man's capacity to kill had to be contained.  And although we averted a nuclear nightmare during the Cold War, we now face proliferation of a scope and complexity that demands new strategies and new approaches.  Just one nuclear weapon exploded in a city -- be it New York or Moscow; Tokyo or Beijing; London or Paris -- could kill hundreds of thousands of people

Inside the Security Council
September 24, 2009

This morning I'm inside the UN Security Council chamber for the special session, chaired by president Obama, on nuclear nonproliferation. Still not sure what to expect, as it's not clear whether anything unexpected might happen and, not unrelated, whether Moamar Qaddafi, whose country is currently a non-permanent Security Council member, will be here. For entertainment's sake, I certainly hope so. Stay tuned. Update: Early sightings as diplomats and leaders fill the room and schmooze: Sam Nunn, Henry Kissinger, Samantha Power.

Qaddafi's Killer Virgins Exposed!
September 24, 2009

Believe it or not, someone made a film about them. You can see the trailer here.

Dangerous Liaisons
September 24, 2009

For years, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez cast himself as President Bush's arch-nemesis, repeatedly accusing the Bush administration of plotting to overthrow the Venezuelan government and to assassinate him. This was how Chávez justified an unprecedented military buildup and his tightening alliances with Russia and Iran.

Qaddafi vs World Cup Soccer
September 23, 2009

This is my lucky day, because I've just discovered that even the King of Kings of Africa has his own blog. And it's pretty great. Unfortunately, like many a blogger, the wacky dictator seems to have lost interest and hasn't posted much lately; his most recent item is a peculiar 2007 call for an international ban on machine guns. ("Wisdom, concern for humanity and humanitarian considerations all demand the elimination of machine guns." True dat.) But nothing competes with his amazing 2006 diatribe against World Cup soccer: First, beware the deadly diseases caused by The World Cup.

Reality TV Concept: Qaddafi and Trump
September 23, 2009

You know what I would watch? Pitch My Tent!, a high-stakes reality show in which eager young builders compete to design the most splendid Bedouin campsite for the approval of Donald Trump and The King of Kings of Africa.

Qaddafi at the U.N.
September 23, 2009

Today was arguably the United Nations at its best. I know that sounds odd, since the day was dominated by the insane musings of Muammar Qaddafi.

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