Austin Frakt

Massachusetts Mandates at Work
August 05, 2010

Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist. During debate over and since passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), there has been some concern over whether the individual and employer mandate provisions will work.  Will employers drop coverage in large numbers once their workers can purchase insurance through exchanges?

Slaughtering the Medicare Cash Cow
August 05, 2010

Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist. The expansion of coverage expected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is paid for in large part by anticipated massive savings from cuts to Medicare. It’s amazing that all that fat was sitting around in the Medicare program–adjustments to hospital reimbursements, reductions in over-payments to private Medicare plans (Medicare Advantage).

The ACA’s Achilles Heel
August 04, 2010

Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist. Earlier this week Jennifer Haberkorn reported in Politico that Republicans plan to use their expected mid-term political mandate to choke off funding for provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Republicans would be able to deny funding only to the pieces of the law that require money from Congress. Doing so could create “Swiss cheese” out of the legislation, with some portions of the law already being funded and others not.

"The Curve Will Be Bent"
August 04, 2010

Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist. Earlier this week the Obama Administration released a report that described savings to the Medicare program that are predicted to follow from changes mandated by the Affordable Care Act.

Is It Possible to Pass Responsible Legislation?
February 01, 2010

Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist, which he created. The purposes of comprehensive health reform are noble: expansion of coverage and control of costs. Yet, the latest attempt to begin to address those goals is near death. For nearly a year Democrats shepherded bills through the complex legislative process, revising and merging them to accommodate the congressional process and political realities.