Delphine Rodrik

In a Sunday New York Times column provoked by two new documentaries—”The Act of Killing,” about the anti-communist massacres in Indonesia in 1965-6, and “Blackfish,” about a SeaWorld orca implicated in the deaths of three people—Nicholas Kristof asked, “Some day, will our descendants be mystified by how good and decent people in the early 21st century—that’s us—could have been so oblivious to the unethical treatment of animals?” They probably will be, and these seven examples wil

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As Judith Shulevitz reports in her latest Phenomenology column in The New Republic, our intense focus on weight loss often overlooks the importance of treating the chronic disease of obesity. Americans usually try to lose weight by exercising, dieting, popping pills, or even turning to surgery. But here are five much weirder ways that countries around the world try to combat obesity—including one far-out method made by a U.S. company.

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The editors of Rolling Stone probably weren't surprised when the cover of their August issue, featuring the bedroom eyes of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, provoked controversy online and off. Worrying that the photo glorifies his image, some Massachusetts businesses are even refusing to sell copies of the issue. But for all the outrage, evildoers have a long history as magazine cover stars. Tsarnaev is the latest proof, it seems, that being a terrorist can get you into a jail cell indefinitely—or land you on a cover for good.

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The Elite Club Petraeus Just Joined

Rich people who make $1 a year

CUNY just dropped Petraeus's salary from $200,000 to one buck. He's not alone. 

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On June 15, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan sent armored cars and riot police to clear Taksim Square. Gezi Park, the site of the original protests within the square, was closed to the public and put under police watch. For weeks after, the neighborhood felt quiet—"like playing house," Sibel, 23, who lives just down the road on Istiklal Avenue, said two weeks ago.

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With the Supreme Court scheduled to release its most anticipated rulings this week, CNN’s embarrassingly wrong interpretation of the Court's Obamacare ruling a year ago was fresh in reporters’ minds.

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The number of women serving in Congress is at a record high—the 2012 elections brought it up to 20 in the Senate and 81 in the House—but Democratic Representative Linda Sánchez, from California's 38th district, was the only one among the total 58 members of Congress on the Nationals Park field Thursday night for that annual display of partisan bipartisanship: the Congressional Baseball Game. The men wore their shirt of choice, the field a medley of high school, college, and pro-team jerseys. Sánchez's jersey, meanwhile, sported a IX on the back, her annual tribute to that famous law amendment.

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