Edmund Wilson

She was rich as sin, but didn't let that stop her from ripping apart the upper class. 

READ MORE >>

An early look at one of America's most beloved painters. 

READ MORE >>

The recent revival of interest in Poe has brought to light a good deal of new information about him and supplied us for the first time with a serious interpretation of his personal career, but it has so far entirely failed to explain why we should still want to read him.

READ MORE >>

I believe that in Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Lawrence has written the best descriptions of sexual experience which have yet been done in England. 

READ MORE >>

Trotsky

January 4, 1933

Seventy-three years ago, on August 21, 1940, the Russian revolutionary leader Leon Trotsky died after an undercover NKVD agent attacked him with an ice axe. In this 1933 essay, Edmund Wilson discusses Trotsky's literary tendencies and his historical ambitions.

READ MORE >>

From the Stacks: “Ulysses”

July 5, 1922

On August 16, 1922, Virginia Woolf penned a passage in her diary panning James Joyce's Ulysses. But New Republic editor Edmund Wilson would have disagreed with her—he, instead, praised it as a "work of high genius." In memoriam of Woolf's legendary take-down, a reprint of Wilson's original review.

READ MORE >>

It was asserted by the present critic, when The Gold Rush appeared last August, that the comedy of the moving pictures had come to be dominated by the school of Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton, the exploitation of comic tricks or gags. And I prophesied that Chaplin, with his finer comedy and his less spectacular farce, would not be able to hold his popularity against it. What has happened is precisely the reverse of what I predicted. The Gold Rush has had a great success; and, so far from playing Chaplin off the screen, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd have taken to imitating him.

READ MORE >>

Portrait of a Sage

A genuine intellectual and his lovely daughters.

READ MORE >>

New Orleans during the Derby.

READ MORE >>

Reunion

Gin shots and the memory of World War I.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR