Eve Fairbanks

Oscar Pistorius' Paranoia

To understand his defense, you need to understand South Africa

To understand his defense, you need to understand South Africa.

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Sending a Bunch of Fulbright Scholars Overseas Is Not 'Soft Diplomacy.'

But there are better reasons not to axe the program

Sending Fulbright Scholars Abroad Is Not 'Soft Diplomacy.' But There Are Better Reasons Not to Axe the Program

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The Dark Spot of Nelson Mandela's Legacy

Is he responsible for South Africa's leadership crisis?

Is he responsible for South Africa's leadership crisis? 

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Media hype aside, the scene outside Nelson Mandela's house was not that dramatic. That's because he turned South Africa into a normal country.

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He was a hero who ranks with Abraham Lincoln. But he left a more ambivalent legacy, too.

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Africa's Obsession with Shopping Malls

Al Shabab attacked the perfect symbol of Kenya's rise

A year ago, a friend from rural South Africa called me full of excitement. His hometown, a large village called Burgersfort, was finally “getting on the map,” he said. I had read that the Burgersfort region had been selected to host 15 new chrome and platinum mines, a huge source of jobs in an otherwise jobs-starved country. I assumed it was the mines he meant, and congratulated him on them. But that’s not what he meant at all, he said. “We’re getting a shopping mall.”

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Nelson Mandela's Less Attractive Legacy

How will history judge the world's favorite saint?

Not as kindly as you think.

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"You Have All the Reasons to Be Angry"

A mine massacre and the fight for South Africa's future

The liberation of South Africa was one of the great triumphs of the twentieth century. What happened next is one of the great disappointments of the twenty-first.

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Giddy-Up!

Outjo, Namibia—Growing up in Namibia in the 1980s, Willem Bezuidenhout was alone with his cowboy dream. He wallpapered his father’s house in the capital of Windhoek with posters of Hopalong Cassidy and shunned play dates to watch The War Wagon again and again in his darkened bedroom, pausing the tape to trace John Wayne’s image onto pieces of translucent paper that he pressed up to the screen. His playmates—the sons of Namibia’s white farmers, doctors, or lawyers, like his father—made fun of him. But that was before the white communities of southern Africa went crazy for country.

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Somewhere amid the burning oil pipelines and wrecked tanks, among the wounded filling the hospitals and the homeless winding out of their ruined cities, lies another potential casualty of the Libyan war: five and a half million olive trees the Italians planted in the desert in the 1930s. Few worldwide may be thinking of these trees as they watch the latest news. But, in South Africa, some people are praying for them.

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