Malcolm Cowley

H.G. Wells' Interview With Stalin Helped Change the Fundamental Principles of Liberalism
October 20, 2014 2:00 PM

The interview launched a war of the words. 

Fitzgerald's Ideas Were Solid. His Books Were a Little More Convoluted.
March 27, 2014

Fitzgerald says that Tender is the Night is his farewell to the members of his own generation; I hope he changes his mind. He has in him at least one

The Miracle of Walt Whitman
March 26, 2014

THERE was a miracle in Whitman's life; we can find no other word for it. In his thirty-seventh year, the local politician and printer and failed editor suddenly be­came a world poet.

The Letters of Malcolm Cowley
March 01, 2014

A selection of Malcolm Cowley's letters from a masterful new collection.

Former Fugleman
May 08, 2013

Recently, there appeared two items concerning H. L. Mencken, and I wish that somebody would explain them. Taken together, they don't make sense. Item I. The Modern Library has reprinted Scott Fitzgerald's best novel, The Great Gatsby.

TNR Film Classic: 'Hell's Angels' (October 1, 1930)
June 11, 2011

Hell’s Angels, according to the unexpectedly accurate statement of its corps of press agents, is “the most pretentious spectacle ever produced.” It cost four million dollars. It took four years to write and film. The producer and director, Mr. Howard Hughes, assembled for it the largest fleet of aircraft ever brought together by an individual—a larger air force than is possessed by the governments of many great countries. In an aerial conflict between Mr. Hughes and China, between Mr. Hughes and the Argentine Republic, between Mr.

The 60's
August 20, 1977

In writing not a few studies of literary history, I haven't said much about the new generation of the 1960s. There is a reason for the oversight. I like to write about situations that I have known at first hand, whereas from 1963 to 1973, the years when the Love Generation flowered and faded, I was a detached observer, a deaf man gardening in the country and writing about books.

Edmund Wilson on The New Republic
July 01, 1972

During the 1920s Edmund Wilson created for himself a special position in the republic or anarchy of American letters: he became the Sainte-Beuve of a

The Story Teller's Story
December 08, 1957

I have lately reread the interviews with novelists and short-story writers that have appeared four times a year in The Paris Review. By now there are

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