Mark Schmitt

John Roberts Didn't Kill Campaign Finance Rules. Modern Politics Did.
April 04, 2014

If you were a political billionaire, would you rather give $5,200 to every candidate, or spend endlessly advertising some partisan issue?

Washington Is Suffering from a Naive Nostalgia for Old-School Political Bosses
The retiring Congressional stars show how much Washington needs free agents
February 27, 2014

Three retiring Capitol Hill superstars show that we need free agents, not just strong parties.

Here's How We Should Think About the Inequality Debate
We need a whole new framework
January 21, 2014

"Inequality" is a concept too sweeping and cluttered to lead to useful solutions. Here's how we should actually think about it.

2013 Was the Year the Grand Bargain Died. Good Riddance.
The magical thinking of the deficit-obsessed
December 19, 2013

The terrible, magical idea that a bunch of insiders can solve big problems by ignoring politics. 

More Partisanship: What We Need to Fix Congress
Stronger political parties would have avoided this week's shutdown
October 01, 2013

Stronger political parties, acting in their own interest, could avoid this week's self-inflicted wounds.

New York's Campaign-Finance Law Worked, but New Yorkers Still Won't Celebrate It
September 16, 2013

The second-day story from New York City’s primaries last week could have been the exceptional performance of the city’s unique system of small-donor public financing.

Who’s the Boss? The Worst Post-Citizen’s United Ruling Yet
September 11, 2012

On August 14, several hundred coal miners joined Mitt Romney at the Century Mine near Bealsville, Ohio, to cheer the Republican nominee as he denounced a “war on coal” by the Obama administration. Two weeks later, an official of the company that owns the mine, Murray Energy Corp. (which has given more than $900,000 to Republican candidates in the last two years, far more than any other coal company) admitted that the miners were not all there by choice. “Attendance at the Romney event was mandatory,” Rob Moore, the chief financial officer of Murray Energy told radio host David Blomquist.

The End of The Scam: Paul Ryan's Victory—or Defeat—Could Transform American Politics
August 13, 2012

For decades, Republicans had a simple approach to debating spending cuts: Keep it abstract. Paul Ryan changes that.

Obama’s Skills on the Campaign Trail Explain His Haplessness in the White House
July 23, 2012

Normal.dotm 0 0 1 152 867 Vassar College 7 1 1064 12.0 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font

Cynics United: When Did Conservatives Change Their Mind About Campaign Finance Disclosure?
June 04, 2012

A decade ago, when Congress was debating the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, better known as McCain-Feingold, the conservative alternative to its modest tightening of regulations on political spending bore the wonderful name DeLay-Doolittle. The name represented not just the two primary sponsors—then-Reps. Tom DeLay and John Doolittle—but also what the bill would do, or not.

Pages