Michael Kazin

To award LBJ a place in the liberal “pantheon,” one has to be afflicted with a kind of nationalist, if not imperial, myopia.

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From 1964 to 1968, close to 34,000 Americans died in South Vietnam. We will never know how many Vietnamese women, men, and children perished during those years, but the total, according to most estimates, was at least one million. Among the dead were tens of thousands of civilians—blown apart by explosives dropped from planes, burned to death by napalm, or gunned down by U.S.

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Rand Paul Doesn't Stand a Chance

Libertarians and the Republican Party

Libertarianism is suddenly in fashion. Denouncing the NSA, Rand Paul draws cheers both from young leftists in Berkeley and young conservatives in D.C.—and narrowly leads in early polls for the 2016 presidential nomination. The Koch brothers—who once bankrolled the Libertarian Party—plan to spend whatever it takes to elect anti-tax, anti-regulation Republicans.

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Now is an excellent time to start a debate about whether the U.S. should be attacking and invading other countries at all.

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The Civil Rights Act Was Not As Important As You Think

It was what came after that changed everything

It was the battles that came after it that really defined its impact.

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Why are we still waiting for a great film about Martin Luther King Jr.?

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On American campuses, there are two lefts.

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We Don't Need Another JFK

Fifty years later, Kennedy's legend makes life at the White House harder for Democrats

For 50 years, Democrats have driven themselves crazy trying to live up to a legend

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A Kind Word for Ted Cruz: America Was Built on Extremism

How unpopular opinions move history forward

American politics is a famously contentious theater, especially today. But the vast majority of liberals, conservatives, and Washington journalists all seem to agree that “extremism” is appalling and should be eradicated.

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Is a new, young left really on the rise? A few weeks ago, Peter Beinart wrote a long online essay which argued strongly in the affirmative. It drew a lot of attention—20,000 “Likes” and almost 5,000 tweets, at last count. And it made a lot of the progressives who read it feel better about politics than at any time since Mitt Romney learned 47 percent was actually the percentage of his popular vote.

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