Michael Kimmage

Looking at the crisis in Crimea as a return to Soviet obscures more than it clarifies

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The 150-Year Hunt for the Great American Novel

And why we need literary scholarship to reunite with literary criticism

Why literary scholarship should reunite with literary criticism. 

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Wendy Lower’s Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields returns the Holocaust to something of its original horror. It is a study of German and Austrian women on the eastern front, and the simple revelation behind their story is that women were no less capable of brutality than men. This might seem banal—the banality of evil across the gender line. Yet Lower’s book is thoroughly shocking. What these women saw and did was shocking. What they believed was shocking.

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Americans tend to have three preoccupations about the recent past: the rights revolutions of the 1960s; Ronald Reagan, his conservative movement, and its legacy; and American-led globalization.1 Remarkably, to an American reader, Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the 21st C

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Americans don’t really build statues to our literary heroes. Are PBS documentaries our substitute?

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The melancholy embrace into which East and West have fallen is the leitmotif of Mishra’s new book, a group biography of three Asian intellectuals.

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In Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith, in over six hundred pages, Andrew Preston charts the scope and the centrality of religion in American politic

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A Consequential Man

Carl Bogus is a fan of sorts, posthumously charmed by William F. Buckley’s wit and winning personality. More than this, Bogus grants enormous stature

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Purity and Danger

The Spiritual-Industrial Complex is a useful book, an evidence-driven meditation on religion and politics in the American vein. Herzog analyzes an ove

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The Interstitials

Robert Vanderlan offers an unromantic book about a magazine, a milieu, and a city. Henry Luce was no Eliot or Sartre. He was a man of sizable intellec

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