Morton Kondracke

Who Wants Peace?
September 28, 1987

MANAGUA—There is a small chance that the causes of peace, democracy, and hemispheric security could be advanced by the Arias plan signed by five Central American presidents in Guatemala on August 7. This could occur if democrats outside Nicaragua (especially Democrats in the U.S. Congress) are uncharacteristically shrewd and stalwart in forcing the Sandinistas to live up to the accord they signed. Timetables need to be drawn up for Sandinistas to meet, leading to full, representative democracy.

Cool Hand Duke
August 30, 1987

Michael Dukakis’s message to the Democratic Party is neither epic nor apocalyptic. He is not promising, like Joe Biden, to restore John F. Kennedy's spiritual days of glory or, like Richard Gephardt, to save the nation from impending economic serfdom to the Japanese and South Koreans.

Seoul Searching
July 22, 1987

  Seoul There's no question that something wonderful happened here on June 29. South Korea's authoritarian government had been expected to concoct the narrowest set of concessions necessary to placate its opposition, stop the rioting, and avoid martial law.

Rookie of the Year
November 05, 1984

Vice Presidential debates are a sideshow, at best, to the main action of a Presidential election, but the pressures on George Bush and Geraldine Ferraro going into their October 11 meeting in Philadelphia nonetheless were enormous. After President Reagan's disastrous debate with Walter Mondale, Bush had to perform more than creditably. It was up to him to defend the Reagan record, undercut the Democratic case, and project some vision of the next four years in a way that Reagan did not.

Debategate
July 18, 1983

It seems virtually certain that the Reagan campaign committed a crime.

Kennedy, Take Two
February 09, 1980

  In the little town of Boone, Iowa, last month. Senator Edward Kennedy was asked one of the crucial questions of the 1980 campaign. The question was put by Mrs.

Bush by a Hair
January 26, 1980

Morton Kondracke reports from Des Moines in 1980.

Superman Crashes
December 22, 1979

If his name had been Edward Moore, as Eddie McCormack bitterly observed in 1962, his candidacy would have been a joke, "but nobody's laughing." And the situation has been much the same for all the 17 years since Edward Moore Kennedy, then only 29, beat McCormack for the right to fill the US Senate seat of his brother. President John Kennedy. And even though Edward Kennedy has had probably as much public attention for all these years as any political figure except the various presidents, nobody's really been looking and listening, either.

The German Challenge to American Conservatives
September 29, 1979

Bonn—Especially if it’s Kennedy versus Reagan in 1980, we are likely to have one of the most ideological presidential elections of the century in the U.S. next year. The conservatives already are saying that what America needs is big tax cuts, more incentives for business investment, balanced budgets, reduced government intervention in the economy, less social spending, more defense, reduction of union power, and fewer environmental controls. Beyond these specific targets, the conservatives (the neoconservatives, particularly) are gearing up for combat over principles.

Kennedy the President
September 23, 1978

Edward Kennedy favors national health insurance, everybody knows. He also favors detente with Soviet Union, a break-up of the big oil companies, immediate normalization of relations with Communist-China, the Equal Rights Amendment and Medicaid-financed abortions. He doesn't think Russian mucking about in Africa should affect our willingness to negotiate arms limitation treaties. He co-sponsored the Humphrey-Hawkins full employment bill. He publicly criticizes human rights violations in Chile, Argentina, South Africa and Nicaragua, but prefers the "quiet approach" to the Soviet Union.

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