Perry Stein

Will the Sequester Start Another Recession?

Answers from actual economists from across the political spectrum

Answers from actual economists from across the political spectrum.

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In 2006, the Israeli Defense Forces made a relatively simple policy change that required soldiers to leave their weapons at their bases when they headed home for the weekend.  The result: a staggering 40 percent drop in the suicide rate among soldiers aged 18-21, according to a November 2010 study. The study has received some renewed interest in America in the wake of Sandy Hook.

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Update: As of 5 p.m. there have been 71,849 calls into Election Protection’s 866-OUR-VOTE Hotline. The trends throughout the day include confusion over voter ID requirements in multiple states; long lines at the polls in part due to early voting restrictions; and inadequate preparation throughout the country—not enough voting machines or polling officials—for a large voter turnout. One of the most significant updates include a number of reports coming out of Pennsylvania—specifically Philadelphia and Pittsburgh—that voters have been wrongfully removed from the voting rolls.

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Virginia's law has earned less scrutiny than other states' but, given the close race, could be more impactful.

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Mitt Romney has long avoided explicitly calling President Obama a socialist, but desperate times call for desperate measures—and that includes another dubious ad, this one linking Obama with a triumvirate of famous socialists. "Who supports Barack Obama?" asks the Spanish-language released this week in Florida. The question is followed by clips of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez saying he’d vote for Obama if he lived in the U.S. and of Mariela Castro, Fidel Castro’s niece, saying she would vote for Obama, too.

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P90X Comes to Washington

The Canadian Embassy hosted a class by the creator of the fitness program partially responsible for Paul Ryan’s abs. Was this an endorsement?

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The thousands of reporters who departed the nation’s capital to cover the Republican National Convention in Florida have done an admirable job covering an important political event. But a big story taking place in the national media’s own backyard, one arguably even more important than the convention, slipped by almost entirely unnoticed: the federal court case pitting South Carolina against the Department of Justice over the state’s controversial Voter ID law.

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In most countries—including the United States—do not have that right, but for the British, things are slightly more complicated.

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A Bill Nelson loss would mark the first time since Reconstruction Era that no Democrat holds a statewide office in Florida.

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