Rosanna Warren

The Decline of the Humanities—and Civilization
July 17, 2013

Humanities professors bear responsibility for the crisis of their profession.

Tashlich
June 13, 2013

We needed a running stream but we had our sins ...

As If
February 20, 2013

The massive, grimy river shouldered its waytoward the harbor.

July
January 13, 2011

Under the cliff walls of apartment blocks, on a narrow patch of grass as tough and discolored as old carpet, they have parked their motorbikes and distributed themselves, a tribe, a colony, girls and boys, some lounged on the sward, some on cement paving in a strip of shade, some on two facing wrought-iron benches planted in concrete. Out of range of grownups, they play cards, they scuffle, a girl places her head on a boy’s lap to practice kissing, they smoke, they pass lit cigarettes back and forth, a smaller boy pops a soccer ball against the wall with slow, heat-drugged, sidewise kicks. Hou

The Joy That Snuck Up
December 07, 2010

Silver Roses is Rachel Wetzsteon’s last book of poems in several senses: it is both her most recent, and, sadly, her final collection, as she died by

Making a Soul
June 16, 2010

Relying neither on traumatic anecdote nor on ostentatious materiality of language, Henri Cole marries verbal rigor to disciplines of memory and observ

D Minor
January 27, 2010

Thirst drove them as if within each kiss something escaped, something salty touched their tongues, as if the kiss within remained unquaffed, as if the melody in Kreisleriana fled each felt-wrapped wooden hammer-knock and floated only in the ghostly hands reflected in the keyboard cover’s up-tilted night As if spring appeared not in petals by day but in the stun of white knock-out lilac scent at midnight, white not seen but suffered and suffused So they tasted and missed As in the park, on the gravel path, a child’s map for a treasure hunt flutters where it was dropped, its directions precisely

The Expanse
January 11, 2010

More than any of Glück’s previous volumes, A Village Life has a generous heart, a large spiritual scope in which to imagine the lives of others