Timothy Snyder

The Battle in Ukraine Means Everything
Fascism returns to the continent it once destroyed
May 11, 2014

The battle in Ukraine means everything

Ukrainian Extremists Will Only Triumph if Russia Invades
April 17, 2014

It is the propaganda of the postwar period, much more than the experience of the war itself, that counts in the memory of Ukrainian politics of today—and that will affect the country's fate.

Far-Right Forces are Influencing Russia's Actions in Crimea
March 17, 2014

The Russian attempt to control Ukraine is based upon Eurasian ideology, which explicitly rejects liberal democracy.

Beneath the Hypocrisy, Putin Is Vulnerable. Here's Where His Soft Spots Are.
March 01, 2014

The Kremlin’s surreal warmongering is, in large part, a move against the European Union—and it demands a response.

Keeping Our Heads
August 24, 2012

The Mauthausen Trial: American Military Justice in Germany By Tomaz Jardim (Harvard University Press, 276 pp., $29.95) Conscience on Trial: The Fate of Fourteen Pacifists in Stalin’s Ukraine, 1952–1953 By Hiroaki Kuromiya (University of Toronto Press, 212 pp., $60) All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals By David Scheffer (Princeton University Press, 533 pp., $35) Justice and the Enemy: Nuremberg, 9/11, and the Trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed By William Shawcross (PublicAffairs, 257 pp., $26.99)    IN 1952, FOURTEEN peasants, owning little more than a few religio

Savagery
March 29, 2012

The Spanish Holocaust: Inquisition and Extermination in Twentieth-Century Spain By Paul Preston (W.W. Norton, 700 pp., $35)  The young Jesuit was an idealist. A slim and bespectacled student of philosophy, Father Fernando Huidobro Polanco dreamed of the redemption of Spain from the evils of its secular, redistributive Republic. A supporter of the military coup by nationalist generals in July 1936, he discounted stories of mass murder of Spanish civilians by the rebels. But knowing that war tries the conscience, he nevertheless wanted to offer pastoral care to the rebel soldiers.

Cruelty and Collapse
October 12, 2011

The End: The Defiance and Destruction of Hitler’s Germany, 1944-1945 By Ian Kershaw (Penguin, 564 pp., $35) It can be harder to lose a war than to win one. Nazi Germany won quick victories in 1939 and 1940 against its eastern and western neighbors, Poland and France. Many Germans who had doubted the wisdom of war came around with enthusiasm to the sound of German boots on the Champs Elysées. Warsaw and Paris fell more quickly and with fewer complications than anticipated. Their conquest convinced many Germans, including army officers, that further campaigns could be won by strokes of genius.

Love and Death
June 09, 2011

The Letters of Rosa Luxemburg Edited by Georg Adler, Peter Hudis, and Annelies Laschitza Translated by George Shriver (Verso, 609 pp., $39.95) Once upon a time there lived a Jewish lady, of modest stature and of a certain age, who walked with a limp and liked to sing to the birds. Through the bars on her window she would treat the titmice to a Mozart aria, and then await their call, the transcription of which she wished, as she wrote to a friend, to be the only adornment on her grave.

Animal Nature
March 03, 2011

Slavenka Drakulić revisits and recrafts some of the most frightening moments in modern literature in her new book, seemingly lightening them for a dis

The Coming Age of Slaughter
December 06, 2010

Environmental panic led to mass killing in the 1940s, and it may do so again.

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