Egypt

Columnists keep saying the Chilean dictator was a brute who modernized the economy. Actually, he was a brute with a rotten economic record. Take heed, Egyptians.

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Why unrest persists in Suez but not in other parts of Egypt.

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The outcome in Egypt has also darkened Western perceptions of the possibility for political evolution in authoritarian states everywhere.

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Egypt's Heroic Protesters Bear Responsibility for the Mess that Followed

The incoherence of Tahrir Square's activists

A new movie might win an Oscar for celebrating Egypt's new "culture of protest." Too bad that culture is so incoherent.

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Hussein Morsi: My Brother's Presidency 'Was a Disaster'

But he hasn't given up hope on a Muslim Brotherhood resurgence

But he hasn't given up hope on a Muslim Brotherhood resurgence

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No Way Out

Syria's Palestinian refugees thought Egypt would be safe. Now they want to get to Europe.

On Friday, 50 Syrian and Palestinian refugees detained in the Montaza II police station in Alexandria, Egypt began a hunger strike. Men, women, and even some children are participating.The UN High Commissioner for Refugees confirmed that they refused food Friday morning, and said that it is in touch with the police and the refugees, trying to convince them to eat.

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“Therefore we hope that ... the maximum penalty will be applied, death by hanging, in the hope that this judgment will be carried out on the walls of the Itahadeya presidential palace in the same place that al-Husseini Abu Deif was martyred.”

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The uprisings now sometimes collectively called “The Arab Spring” seemed at first like stories about the political and economic empowerment of young people. But in Egypt, after the military removed President Mohamed Morsi from power in July, some youth have begun to look at the events of the last two years in a different light: In February of 2011, President Hosni Mubarak stepped down with millions of Egyptians in the streets.

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Alaa Al-Aswany is Egypt’s preeminent novelist. His 2002 best-seller The Yacoubian Building highlighted the political corruption, moral duplicity, and economic inequality of contemporary Egypt, and established him as one of the most influential critics of Hosni Mubarak’s regime.

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